Beer Health Benefits

Surprising health benefits of beer

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Dr Manny’s Notes

Published December 28, 2012

FoxNews.com

As a doctor, I get a lot of questions from patients in my practice and in my email inbox. Here’s one that was sent to me recently by a viewer:

Dr. Manny, are there any health benefits to drinking beer? Which beers are the ‘healthiest’? – Brian

Well, Brian, this is what I have to say: If you’ve got a New Year’s Eve party coming up, don’t be afraid to knock back a cold one. Beer has several surprising health benefits.

Despite beer’s bad reputation, it actually has a number of natural antioxidants and vitamins that can help prevent heart disease and even rebuild muscle. It also has one of the highest energy contents of any food or drink. Of course, this means you need to set limits – one beer gets you going, four makes you fat.

If you’re worried about dehydration, keep in mind that beer is 93 percent water. Also, according to a Spanish study, beer may actually provide better hydration than H2O alone when you’re sweating it out under the sun.

So with all of this in mind, which kind of beer should you reach for? Calorie-wise, you may be tempted to grab a light lager, but for health benefits, a dark beer is the better choice.

beer

Dark beers tend to have the most antioxidants, which help reverse cellular damage that occurs naturally in the body. A recent study published in the Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture has also found that dark beer has higher iron content compared to lighter beers. Remember, iron is an essential mineral that our bodies need. Iron is a part of all cells and does many jobs including carrying oxygen from our lungs throughout the rest of our bodies.

Another good choice is microbrews, which are healthier than mass-produced cans, because they have more hops. Hops contain polyphenols, which help lower cholesterol, fight cancer and kill viruses.

Just remember the golden rule: Everything in moderation. You don’t want to embarrass yourself in front of your friends by drinking too much, and you certainly don’t want to put yourself at risk for any long-term health effects like liver problems, kidney diseases and heart disease.

Read more: http://www.foxnews.com/health/2012/02/10/what-are-health-benefits-beer/?intcmp=trending#ixzz2Gb5at2Ul

9 Things Your Dog Wants to Tell You

9 Things Your Dog Wants to Tell You

Learn what your pooch’s behavior is really saying about you, your home and more

By Alexandra Gekas

We like to ascribe all sorts of emotions to our dogs, but, truth be told, they are much simpler than humans. They’re motivated by the basics: food, activity and companionship. That said, a dog’s behavior around his owners does have meaning. From the desire to protect you to an intuition about your health and happiness, read on to discover what your dog would tell you if he could speak.

“I want to protect you.”

You may think your dog belongs to you, but you belong to your dog, as well. That means he is going to claim you and protect you. “When he’s sitting on your foot, it’s an ownership thing. If his [bottom] is on you, he’s marking your foot,” says Jennifer Brent, animal advocate and external relations manager for the L.A.-based non profit animal welfare advocacy group Found Animals. “It’s not just that he wants to be close to you, he’s saying, ‘This is mine; now it smells like me, don’t go near it.’ He does this for three main reasons: to feel secure about his place in your life, to warn other dogs that you are spoken for and because he wants to protect you.” To ensure your protection, dogs will also bark at guests, growl at other dogs when outside and pull on the leash while out for a walk. “There’s a line of thinking that the dog is your scout. He sees himself as a member of the pack, and he wants to make sure everything is cool before you get there,” Brent says. Photo: Thinkstock

“I can sense when you’re in a bad mood.”

Whether it was a stressful day at work or a fight with your significant other, your dog will pick up on how you feel—and feel it, too. “It goes without saying, when you’re stressed, they’re more stressed; when you’re happier, they’re happy. They match up moods with you better than a spouse or a partner,” says Marty Becker, DVM, pet expert at Vetstreet.com. “They sit there and study you.” This relationship works the other way, too: If you want to make your pooch relax, you know just where to scratch; if you want to be more playful, you know how to pet him. “You can, like a gas pedal, change that dynamic with your dog,” Dr. Becker says. Photo: Matthew Williams-Ellis/Thinkstock

“I need more exercise!”

If she’s eliminating on the floor, chewing the furniture or running circles around the coffee table, your dog is probably trying to tell you she needs more activity in her life. “That’s where we see a lot of behavioral issues with dogs in households,” Brent says. This is particularly true for active breeds, such as herding or hunting dogs. “The Dalmatian was trained to be a hunting dog. You can’t take an animal that’s used to running eight miles a day, put it in an apartment, and expect it to be OK. If your dog’s destroying stuff, he’s saying, ‘I’m bored, you need to give me something to do.'” While exercise is important—dogs should receive 45 to 60 minutes of physical exercise and 15 minutes of behavioral training per day—Dr. Becker says you can also play mental games to keep your pooch entertained. Make her play search-and-seek games for her food or even use food puzzles that she has to solve before her meal is dispensed. Photo: Shutterstock

“I’m scared you won’t come back.”

While most dogs are going to bark for a few minutes when you leave the house—just to let you know you’re forgetting someone—some dogs have a much more serious reaction. “If you watch a video of a dog with separation anxiety, it’ll tear your heart out. It’s like the kid lost at the mall without his parents,” Dr. Becker says. “They freak out. They think you’re not coming back. They often attack the area where you leave; they’ll tear up the doorframe, they’re destructive. If you come home and they’ve had diarrhea or [are excessively] panting, their cortisol levels are high, and you have to take action.” Dr. Becker recommends speaking with a dog behaviorist to receive a training program and possibly a canine antidepressant. To help assuage the trauma associated with your departure, you can try these training intervals: Put your coat on, grab your keys and go stand outside for 30 seconds. Come back in, and then go out for one minute, then five, and build from there. It’s also helpful to give your dog a treat before you leave, or feed him using an interactive food puzzle to keep him distracted. Photo: Shutterstock

“I can tell when you’re not feeling well.”

It’s a hard phenomenon to explain, but many dogs seem to be able to detect illness in their owners. And new evidence has found that some dogs can actually detect a wide array of serious conditions, including cancer, as well as seizures related to epilepsy. “We know that there’s a chemical marker that a few dogs are detecting, just like they can detect bed bugs, mold, peanuts, drugs and explosives,” Dr. Becker says. “They can smell the ketones on a diabetic’s breath when their sugar is low. For epileptics [about to have a seizure], they can alert their owner so they can get out of harm’s way.” Some canines are even more naturally empathetic to humans. Often, these dogs become therapy dogs, providing affection to those in need, while also sensing—and being able to react to—health problems. “Some people just need a dog to lay still with them; others need a reason to get out of the bed. It’s the weirdest thing how therapy dogs know when to [move] close or far away,” says Dr. Becker. Photo: Shutterstock

“Pay attention when I’m not myself.” 

It’s important to pay attention to your pooch’s behavior because if something seems amiss, he’s probably not feeling well. “You want to catch things in the earliest period to prevent unnecessary pain or worse,” says Dr. Becker. “I call it ‘Dog-ter Mom,’ because 80% of caregivers for pets are women. You just need to pay attention to your intuition.” That means noticing behavior that’s out of the norm: he’s not as playful as usual, he’s acting aggressively, he has trouble getting up or isn’t eating properly. “You want to pay particular attention to eating habits,” Dr. Becker says. “Food is their currency. If he isn’t eating enough or is eating too much, if he’s drinking more water or needs to eliminate more, or if you have a dog that’s losing weight, then something’s wrong.” Photo: Adam Wasilewski/Thinkstock

“I need a routine, but with a little variety.”

They say that a dog’s mental capacity is that of a toddler; and just like a toddler, dogs thrive on routine. “Knowing what to expect is really, really important, otherwise they don’t know how to react,” Brent says. A general routine is best, but that doesn’t mean you have to do everything at the same time each day. In fact, varying the time will actually help in the long run, says Dr. Becker. Otherwise, your dog will start running the show. “You don’t want them to force how the clock works,” he says. If they do, it’s likely that your dog will “insist on his 5 a.m. feeding on a Sunday, when you want to sleep until 8 a.m. Vary it up. If you control their food, you control them—in a good way.” Photo: Thinkstock

“Be clear when I’m doing something wrong.”

Correcting your dog is important—and how you do it is key. Avoid explaining your dog’s behavior to him, or using a calm voice. Take a firm (not mean) tone and be direct. “Dogs respond to tone. If you say, ‘No!’ while a bad action is happening, you’re going to get a much better response than if you say it in a gentle voice or wait to say it afterwards,” Brent says. To ensure results, it has to be said in the moment of action, and in the same way every time. “If you want to train your dog to be calm when he sees another dog, you can’t wait until that dog has passed to give him a treat for being good. You can’t wait until you get home,” Brent says. “That says putting down the leash means a treat, instead of the action [you’re trying to reinforce].” Photo: Shutterstock

“I’m not a human.”

There’s no doubt your dog is part of the family—but that doesn’t mean she should be treated like a person. “Thinking your dog has the motivation of a person is the number one problem I see,” says Gina Spadafori, pet columnist and executive editor of the PetConnection.com. Whether your dog eliminates in the house or chews up the remote, the cause has nothing to do with revenge. “It’s not an emotional or rational response. It’s either a lack of training, illness or a stress reaction that can be triggered by a change in the house,” Spadafori says. So if your dog is acting out, start by trying to find the root cause. Is she sick, improperly trained or has there been a recent change in routine? Once you locate the cause, understanding and correcting her behavior will be much easier. Photo: Chris Amaral/Thinkstock

Read more: Dog Language – Understanding Dog Behavior at WomansDay.com – Woman’s Day

Teenage Marijuana Use May Hurt Future IQ

 

Teenage Marijuana Use May Hurt Future IQ

Reported by Drs. Tiffany Chao and  Shari Barnett:

Teenagers lighting joints may end up less bright, according to new research  released Monday.

In a study of more than 1,000 adolescents in New Zealand, those who began habitually smoking marijuana before age 18 showed an eight-point drop in IQ between the ages of 13 and 38, a considerable decline.

The average IQ is 100 points. A drop of eight points represents a fall from the 50th percentile to the 29th percentile in terms of intelligence.

The research, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, charted the IQ changes in participants over two decades.

Researchers tested the IQs of all of the study subjects at age 13 before any habitual marijuana use. Researchers then split the study into five “waves” during which time they assessed cannabis use — ages 18, 21, 26, 32, and 38. They again tested IQ at age 38. The authors also controlled for alcohol use, other drug use and education level.

The eight-point drop in IQ was found in subjects who started smoking in adolescence and persisted in “habitual smoking” — that is, using cannabis at least four days per week — in three or more of the five study waves.

People who started smoking in adolescence but used marijuana less persistently still had a hit to their IQ’s, but it was less pronounced than the group that used it early and persistently.

In contrast, those who never used marijuana at all gained nearly one IQ point on average.

Madeline Meier, lead researcher and a post-doctoral associate at Duke University, said that persistent use of marijuana in adolescence appeared to blunt intelligence, attention and memory. More persistent marijuana use was associated with greater cognitive decline.

“Collectively, these findings are consistent with speculation that cannabis use in adolescence, when the brain is undergoing critical development, may have neurotoxic effects,” Meier writes in the study.

Of particular worry is the permanence of these effects among people who began smoking marijuana in adolescence. Even after these subjects stopped using marijuana for a year, its adverse effects persisted and some neurological deficits remained. People who did not engage in marijuana smoking until after adolescence showed no adverse effects on intelligence.

Experts in child development said the reasons adolescents may be more susceptible to the harmful effects of marijuana may have to do with a substance called myelin. Myelin can be thought of as a kind of insulation for nerve cells in the brain that also helps speed brain signals along — and in adolescent brains, the protective coating it forms is not yet complete.

“Frontal lobe myelination is not fully completed until age 25 years or so, and the pre-myelinated brain is more susceptible to damage from neurotoxins,” says Dr. Richard Wahl, director of adolescent Medicine at the University of Arizona. “Cannabis, most likely, is a neurotoxin in high and continuous doses.”

The study appears to lend credence to “stoner” stereotypes in popular media. However, no previous studies can  provide data for this phenomenon, since establishing whether a drop in IQ has actually occurred requires that a baseline IQ be obtained before a person ever started using marijuana.  This study did just that.

“[The findings] provide evidence for the actual — rather than ideological and legal — basis for concerns regarding cannabis use,” said Dessa Bergen-Cico, a assistant professor of public health, food studies and nutrition at Syracuse University.  “These findings reinforce recommendations on the importance of primary prevention, evidence based drug education and policy efforts targeting not only adolescents, but elementary age children before they start.”

Though the study was conducted among New Zealand young people, the findings could be extended to adolescents in the United States as well. According to statistics released in June by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, American teenagers today are more likely to be using marijuana than tobacco products. Of particular worry  is the attitude that marijuana is one of the more harmless drugs.

“Increasing efforts should be directed toward delaying the onset of cannabis use by young people,” writes Meier, “particularly given the recent trend of younger ages of cannabis-use initiation in the United States and evidence that fewer adolescents believe that cannabis use is associated with serious health risk.”

VSEBT Keeping Healthcare Increases Down

Over the past many years, employers have been facing double digit increases in healthcare costs.  A recent study, conducted by Aon/Hewitt, the largest employee benefits company in the world, compared the four year base increases on an apples-to-apples basis and showed the remarkable results achieved by Valley Schools Employee Benefits Trust (VSEBT) over the last four years.  These results are a combination of professional management, wellness programs, comprehensive information and planning, and the benefit of group purchasing by groups of employers.

aon hewitt

logo vsmg

Here is one of the key charts that shows overall trend, or medical inflation for the trust.

 

–Aon Hewitt’s trend survey illustrates expected cost increases for the average employer before  any changes in plan design
–Trends are as reported by carriers and have a conservative bias
chart 1

Holiday Overeating Can Cause “Jet-lag”

Holiday gluttony affects your ‘food clock’: study; Food excess can have the same effect on your system as being jet-lagged

Researchers from the University of California, San Francisco, have found out how holiday decadence can affect your body on a molecular level in what they say is one of the first studies of its kind.

AFP RELAXNEWS

WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 26, 2012, 2:53 PM

	Overloading on holiday treats can upset the balance of your body's "food clock," researchers say.

PAUL ORR/SHUTTERSTOCK.COM

Overloading on holiday treats can upset the balance of your body’s “food clock,” researchers say.

New research finds that holiday eating excess can have the same effect on your system as being jet-lagged, in that all those buttery sweets and alcoholic beverages can upset your body’s “food clock.”

Researchers from the University of California, San Francisco, have found out how holiday decadence can affect your body on a molecular level in what they say is one of the first studies of its kind.

A day of eating rich food and staying up late can upset the balance of your “food clock,” which the researchers describe as a collection of interacting genes and molecules that keep the human body on a metabolic even keel.

In a series of tests with lab mice, the researchers found that disruptions in regular eating and sleeping cycles especially effect mice lacking a protein called PKCγ, which could provide clues into the molecular basis of obesity and diabetes. Mice lacking PKCγ weren’t able to bounce back as quickly as mice with the protein after disruptions to their 24-hour cycle.

The researchers add that the findings could explain why night owls are more likely to be obese than early risers.

Read more: http://www.nydailynews.com/life-style/health/holiday-gluttony-effect-jet-lag-body-article-1.1227583#ixzz2GKH0Xzoj

Poor Texting Can Indicate Stroke Onset

 

UOK? ‘Dystextia’ Alerts Doctors To Neurological Problems

by MICHAELEEN DOUCLEFF

December 24, 2012 4:09 PM
Doctors used a type of MRI test to look at the blood vessels in the brain of a woman with dystextia. The test confirmed she was suffering from a stroke on the right side of her brain

Doctors used a type of MRI test to look at the blood vessels in the brain of a woman with dystextia. The test confirmed she was suffering from a stroke on the right side of her brain

Archives of Neurology

A young, pregnant woman went for a routine doctor’s visit to find out her due date. As she was leaving the office, she got a text message from her husband:

Husband: So what’s the deal?

Wife: Every where thinging days nighing

Wife: Some is where!

Husband: What the hell does that mean?

Husband: You’re not making any sense.

Turns out the woman was having a stroke. And her garbled texting — something doctors are now calling ‘dystextia’ — was an early clue to the problem.

Concerned by the nonsensical messages, the husband met up with his wife and rushed her to the emergency room. Neurologists quickly realized that a region of her brain involved with language was damaged.

“The dystextia was the first clinical sign that we had that she was having a stroke,” Dr. Joshua Klein at the Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston, Mass., tells Shots.

Impaired speech is a common sign of a stroke, he says. But in this case, the woman had lost her voice because of a cold. So the series of mangled messages were the smoking gun of a language problem.

He and his colleagues describe the case in the Archives of Neurology.

The dystextia wasn’t essential to diagnosing the stroke, Klein says. They would’ve figured it out from tests they ran and other symptoms, such as numbness in the woman’s right arm.

Another MRI of the woman's brain showed signs of a stroke in a region involved with language.

Another MRI of the woman’s brain showed signs of a stroke in a region involved with language.

Archives of Neurology

“But it [the dystextia] was an unusual piece of data that fit with the other clinical findings,” he says. “It helped us understand the nature of the problem.”

The woman luckily suffered no permanent damage and quickly recovered her ability to speak and to text.

Klein thinks text messages will become increasingly important for neurologists as electronic conversations replace a lot of verbal communication.

Dystexia has been linked to a stroke at least once before. And it’s been seen in a patient with a complex migraine, which can cause a variety of neurological symptoms, such as difficulty speaking and vision loss.

But there are many reasons why people mess up texts messages: You can bewalking, driving, drinking or just generally distracted.

So how do you know when dystextia is cause for concern?

Everything has to be taken in context, Klein notes. But he says if someone is having a problem communicating for some unknown reason, whether it be talking, texting or even reading, they should get checked out by a doctor.

In particular, Klein says, some warning signs of stroke include problems formulating the words you want to text, trouble typing the text because your fingers are numb or weak, or sudden vision loss.

As you probably know, though, many smartphones have an auto-correct function that can introduce erroneous word substitutions in messages. “This can give the false impression of a language disorder,” Klein says. “In our patient’s case, auto-correct had been previously disabled on her mobile device.”

ABS Breakfast Ideas for Men

 

ABS DIET: PERFECT BREAKFAST RECIPES

Breakfast wakes up your metabolism and tells it to start burning fat, decreasing your risk of obesity

Posted Date: June 29, 2004
Banana Split Smoothie

(number of Powerfoods: 3)

What you need:

1 banana

1/2 cup low-fat vanilla yogurt

1/8 cup frozen orange juice concentrate

1/2 cup 1% milk

2 teaspoons whey powder

6 ice cubes, crushed

 

How to prepare: Blend until smooth in blender. Makes 2 8-ounce servings.

Calories per serving: 171; Protein: 8 g; Carbs: 33 g; Fat: 2 g; Saturated fat: 1 g; Sodium: 94 mg; Fiber: 2 g

Very Berry Smoothie

(number of Powerfoods: 4)

What you need:

3/4 c instant oatmeal, nuked in water or skim milk

3/4 c skim milk

3/4 c mixed frozen berries

2 tsp whey powder

3 ice cubes, crushed

 

How to prepare: Blend until smooth in blender.

Makes 2 8-ounce servings

Per serving: 144 calories, 7 grams (g) protein, 27 g carbohydrates, 1 g fat (0 g saturated), 4 g fiber, 109 milligrams (mg) sodium

Breakfast Bacon Burger

(number of Powerfoods: 4)

What you need:

1 Thomas’ Honey Wheat English Muffin

1/2 teaspoon trans fat-free margarine

1 egg

1 slice low-fat American cheese

1 slice Canadian bacon

Vegetables of choice

 

How to prepare:

1. Split the muffin, toast it, and add margarine.

2. Break the egg in a microwavable dish, prick the yolk with a toothpick, and cover the dish with plastic wrap.

3. Microwave on high for 30 seconds. Let stand for 30 seconds. Add cheese, egg, and Canadian bacon to the muffin, then nuke for 20 seconds.

4. Add vegetables to taste.

Makes 1 serving.

Calories per serving: 300; Protein: 22 g; Carbs: 28 g; Fat: 11 g; Saturated fat: 3.5 g; Sodium: 868 mg; Fiber: 3 g

The I-Haven’t-Had-My-Coffee-Yet Sandwich

(number of Powerfoods: 3)

What you need:

1 1/2 teaspoons low-fat cream cheese

1 whole-wheat pita, halved to make 2 pockets

2 slices turkey or ham

Lettuce or green vegetable

 

How to prepare:

1. Spread cream cheese in the pockets of the pita.

2. Stuff with meat and vegetables.

3. Put in mouth. Chew and swallow.

Makes 1 serving.

Calories per serving: 225; Protein: 10 grams; Carbs: 42 g; Fat: 3 g; Saturated fat: 1 g; Sodium: 430 mg; Fiber: 6 g

Eggs Beneficial Breakfast Sandwich

(number of Powerfoods: 5)

What you need:

1 large whole egg

3 large egg whites

1 tsp ground flaxseed

2 slices whole-wheat bread, toasted

1 slice Canadian bacon

1 tomato, sliced, or 1 green bell pepper, sliced

 

How to prepare:

1. Scramble the whole egg and egg whites in a bowl.

2. Add the flaxseed to the mixture.

3. Fry it in a nonstick skillet treated with vegetable-oil spray and dump it onto the toast.

4. Add the bacon and tomato, pepper, or other vegetables of your choice.

Makes 1 serving.

Wash it all down with 8 ounces of orange juice, and make it the high-pulp kind. More fiber that way.

Per serving: 399 calories, 31 g protein, 46 g carbohydrates, 11 g fat (3 g saturated), 6 g fiber, 900 mg sodium

Read more at Men’s Health: http://www.menshealth.com/nutrition/abs-diet-perfect-breakfast-recipes#ixzz2GKJ0KGbY