Ten Favorite Juice Recipes

You Ask, I Deliver: My Top Ten Favorite Juice Recipes

by Gena on June 17, 2009

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Hi everyone!

As usual, I hope you’re all having great weeks. I was delighted by the response to my last post on juicing and blending—it sounds as though this question had been on some of your minds for a while! And I was delighted to see that the post provoked this question, from my friend Briana:

“Gena, I would love to see some of your favorite fruit and veg combos for juicing. All of your recipes are so good that I’m sure your juice recipes would be awesome, too :).”

My pleasure, Briana!

Here are my top ten favorite juice recipes. All of these are tried and true staples in my home, and they’re also proven to be big hits with my friends. I’ve included a mix of fruitier juices (for newbies) and more alkalizing, vegetable rich juices for my juicing pros out there. All of the recipes yield between 24-32 oz, and the procedure for all is the same: throw the ingredients in your juicer and go!

As with all of my recipes, think of these as templates, not prescriptions! Feel free to modify them as you like by adding or subtracting ginger, lemon, garlic, different veggie mixtures, or – if you do supplements – whatever supplements you like. There possibilities are endless, and now that summer is here, you have many warm months to quench your thirst with top juicer recipes. Enjoy!

Gena’s Classic Green Juice

I drink this juice every single morning, and often twice a day. Feel free to add some lemon if you like (and if you have a Breville, you can put it right into your juicer) to make it “green lemonade.” You can also omit the ginger if you don’t like it spicy.

And if you’re really hardcore about your green juice, go ahead and omit the apple!

1 green apple
1 inch knob ginger
5 large stalks celery
1 cucumber
1 large handful parsley
5 stalks kale

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The Pink Lady (inspired by Café Blossom)

I don’t typically go for the fruitier juices, but the first time I had this juice – at the lovely Café Blossom on the Upper West Side – I was hooked!

1 pear
1 beet
1-2 inches ginger
1 ½ cups pineapple, in chunks

Veggie Ginger Juice

A standard “mixed veggie” concoction that’s spiced up by the ginger. This is a great “warming” juice for the cold months.

3 large carrots
1 beet
1 green apple
4 large stalks celery
1 large handful of spinach, parsley, or other dark green
1 small cucumber
1 inch knob ginger

Carrot Romaine

This is a terrific juice for anyone who is new to juicing! It’s sweet, but it still benefits from the alkalizing romaine. It’s a big hit with kids, too!

6 large carrots
1 head romaine

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Cucumber Pear Cooler

An amazingly refreshing and simple summertime treat.

And although I’m not a drinker, I must confess that I can imagine this would be a terrific cocktail base! ;-)

1 large or 2 small cucumbers
1-2 pears (depends on size)

Summertime Mojito

A virgin mojito that is fresh, simple, and delicious! ‘Nuff said.

1 cucumber
1 large pear
1 large handful mint
½ lime

Think Pink

A green twist on the Pink Lady.

1 beet
1 green apple
1 pear
6 large leaves romaine
1 inch ginger

Baby’s First Green

This is the perfect elixir for anyone who’s a bit new to green juice! Sweet, but not too sweet.

1 large pear
1 apple
1 cup pineapple, cubed
4 large stalks kale
1 cucumber

Greens and Carrot

A wonderful, nutritionally rich, and cleansing juice.

½ head romaine leaves
4 stalks kale
5 large stalks celery
1 cucumber
4 large carrots

Sweet and Sour

A sassy sweet combination that awakens the palate, this is equally fun without the grapefruit.

1 apple
4 large carrots
1 beet
1 inch ginger
1-2 cups grapefruit

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VSEBT Quarterly Benefits Meeting to Explore Health Issues

The April Quarterly Benefits Meeting conducted by the Valley Schools Employee Benefits Trust (VSEBT) will include a number of recognized health and benefit experts briefing human resources and benefits staff on how better to serve their staff and their family members.  Aflac’s expert on benefits will start out the session, followed by presentations on HIPAA regulations regarding patient privacy, and COBRA administration and legal issues from Eiverness Consulting Group, Ltd.

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The program will conclude with presentations by Andrea Billings of Aon/Hewitt on the latest changes to the Affordable Health Care Act regulations regarding variable hour employees and a report by Hays Consulting on renewal trends and medical cost factors.

Andrea Billings, Aon/Hewitt

Andrea Billings, Aon/Hewitt

Congratulations to VSEBT for maintaining such a vigorous program of information and updates for their participating members.  With healthcare changing every moment, it is good to know some organizations are staying ahead of the changes.

 

New app puts speech therapy in patients’ pockets

New app puts speech therapy in patients’ pockets

Published March 09, 2014

FoxNews.com

Technology and medicine are working together in a smart new way: By putting speech therapy in patients’ pockets. The Name That! smart phone app helps patients with a type of speech disorder called aphasia.

The app was developed by AppsLab at the University of Northern Iowa (UNI), which seeks to help professors or faculty develop apps with educational value.

“Typically the clients that we work with are adults who have had some kind of neurological damage,” app co-creator Dr. Angela Burda, a professor in the department of communication sciences and disorders at UNI, told FoxNews.com. “Typically a stroke, perhaps a brain injury, sometimes tumors — sometimes it can be as a result of a surgery to remove tumors.”

Patients can use the app to practice matching pictures and associated words, according to Dr. Stephen Hughes, who helped build the app.

“So we’re looking at the kinds of things that they’re doing already with paper and pencil and saying, ‘Can we use the technology to help them manage that experience better?’” Hughes said.

The Name That! app isn’t meant to take the place of traditional treatment. Rather, the creators hope that it will supplement what speech therapists already do in sessions. Hughes and Burda are currently working on expanding the app’s simplistic design in order to fit more needs of aphasia patients.

Other aphasia experts, like Dr. Jean K. Gordon, a professor and aphasia expert at the University of Iowa, support using smart phone technology as part of treatment because of recent advancement and benefits in the technology.

“We’ve used computers in aphasia therapy for decades, but they were always big and clunky,” Gordon explained. “But the nice thing is now people are using these multipurpose devices. They’re more portable, cheaper, and they don’t mark them off as being disabled. I think that we’re going to continue to see more and more apps like this.”

Enjoy Life More—Your Body Will Age Better, Study Shows

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A new study from the U.K. claims that people who enjoy life will have better physical function and faster walking speeds than their more pessimistic counterparts. We already know there are health benefits associated with a positive outlook on life.  A study from 2013 suggested people who have happy marriages also enjoy better physical health than couples in stressful marriages. In 2012, a study by researchers at University College London (UCL) in the U.K. found seniors who enjoy life more tend to live longer. As part of a follow-up study testing the link between happiness and physical performance, the UCL researchers have assessed the enjoyment of life of 3,199 participants aged 60 years or older.

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The participants in the study were asked to rate on a four-point scale how much they subscribed to the following statements: “I enjoy the things that I do,” “I enjoy being in the company of others,” “On balance, I look back on my life with a sense of happiness” and “I feel full of energy these days.” Interviewing the people in the study, the researchers then assessed to what extent they had difficulty performing daily activities, such as bathing or getting dressed.  They also measured the walking speed of the participants.

The study found that people who had a low sense of well-being were more than three times as likely to experience problems in performing daily activities. “Our results provide further evidence that enjoyment of life is relevant to the future disability and mobility of older people,” says Dr. Steptoe, co-author of the study. “Efforts to enhance well-being at older ages may have benefits to society and health care systems.” Although the study recorded—perhaps unsurprisingly—that people suffering from chronic illness and lower levels of enjoyment of life, Dr. Steptoe says the link between happiness and physical health is not simply that happier people are healthier: “This is not because the happier people are in better health, or younger, or richer, or have more healthy lifestyles at the outset, since even when we take these factors into account, the relationship persists. Our previous work has shown that older people with greater enjoyment of life are more likely to survive over the next 8 years; what this study shows is that they also keep up better physical function.”

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Dr. Steptoe’s previous study found that nearly three times more people in the study group of over 50s who had low enjoyment of life and died, compared with participants who enjoyed life more. That study considered social isolation in seniors—having few hobbies or social interactions—as being a factor in a loss of enjoyment in life. It found that 1 in 6 people aged 50 and over living in England were socially isolated. But there was also a socio-economic aspect—the wealthier seniors were half as likely to become socially isolated as the less wealthy people in the study.

In the new study, people with higher socio-economic status and education were also more likely to enjoy life. Married and working people also scored higher on the happiness scale than retired or single seniors. “The study shows that older people who are happier and enjoy life more show slower declines in physical function as they age,” Dr. Steptoe concludes.

“They are less likely to develop impairments in activities of daily living such as dressing or getting in or out of bed, and their walking speed declines at a slower rate than those who enjoy life less.”

Source: http://www.medicalnewstoday.com

Provided by Rebecca McGonigle of the Valley Schools Employee Benefits Trust (VSEBT) from the March Wellstyles Monthly Newsletter.

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