David Peterson is a Candidate for Director of ASBO International

 

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David Peterson, J.D., SFO, Ed.D.

Candidate for Director

Superintendent
Scottsdale Unified School District
Scottsdale, Arizona

David Peterson has been a member of the Arizona Association of School Business Officials for almost 20 years and has been a member of ASBO International for the past 15 years, serving on the Legislative Affairs Committee. Dr. Peterson is a past president and director of AASBO and he has won several honors and awards, including the State of Arizona Governor’s Award for Energy Efficiency. He earned the Certified Administrator of School Finance and Operations (SFO) designation. He presents at many State and National Conference on Educational Facilities and School Finance.

He joined the Scottsdale Unified School District family in July 2005 as the Chief of Facilities Management for Learners. Was promoted to Assistant Superintendent in 2007 and has served as the Superintendent for the past three years. He is a graduate of the U.S. Naval Academy, holds a Juris Doctorate from Concord School of Law and a Certificate of Negotiation and Mediation from Harvard Law School and is a member of the California State Bar. Additionally, he has a Doctorate of Education from Nova Southeastern University, a Certificate of School Business Management from Central Arizona College, a Certificate of Public Schools Planning and Design from Harvard University, and a Master Degree in Civil Engineering from Arizona State University.

Prior to joining SUSD, Dr. Peterson served as the Director of Operations for Mesa Public Schools. He currently serves on the Board of Directors for the Arizona School Alliance and Valley Schools Employee Benefit Trust.

– See more at: http://asbointl.org/about/leadership-governance/candidate-information/david-peterson,-j-d-,-sfo,-ed-d#sthash.uaqcffHQ.xPaAkjwu.dpuf

Running Just 5-10 Minutes A Day Could Increase Life Expectancy

 Running Just 5-10 Minutes A Day Could Increase Life Expectancy

The Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans recommend adults engage in high-intensity exercise, such as running, for a minimum of 75 minutes a week. But a new study from Iowa State University suggests that running at a slow speed for just 5-10 minutes a day can significantly reduce mortality risk, and running for any longer may actually do more harm than good. The research team, led by Duck-Chul “D.C.” Lee, an assistant professor of kinesiology at Iowa State, recently published their findings.

For their study, Lee and colleagues assessed the data of 55,137 adults between the ages of 18 and 100 years, who were followed-up for an average of 15 years.

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Participants’ physical activity habits were disclosed through a medical history questionnaire. The team also analyzed the causes of any deaths that occurred during the follow-up, before looking at the amount of exercise each individual participated in every week.

During the follow-up period, 3,413 participants died from all-causes, while 1,217 died from cardiovascular causes. Of these, 24% participated in running on a weekly basis. The team found that participants who engaged in running each week were 30% less likely to die from all-causes and 45% less likely to die from cardiovascular causes, compared with those who did not participate in running. Overall, runners were likely to live 3 years longer than non-runners. But most interestingly, the researchers found that these reduced mortality risks were the same among participants who ran less than an hour a week and those who ran more than 3 hours a week. Even those who ran 5-10 minutes a day at a slow speed showed significantly reduced all-cause and cardi-ovascular mortality risk, com-pared with non-runners, according to the team.

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Lee says, “Running is good for your health, but more may not be better. You don’t have to think it’s a big challenge. We found that even 10 minutes per day is good enough. You don’t need to do a lot to get the benefits from running.” Lee notes that it may actually be better to run for only 5-10 minutes a day, as running for long periods could cause more harm than good. It could cause bone and joint damage, for example, and even heart attacks. “With too much of vigorous-intensity aerobic exercise, there might be a side effect,” says Lee. “Is there any limit that we shouldn’t go over? It is possible that people who do too much might be harming their health.” But he notes that further studies looking at the side effects of high-intensity exercise need to be conducted before any firm conclusions can be made.

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For now, the researchers say their find-ings emphasize the significant health benefits that can be gained from just running a few minutes each day. “This study may motivate healthy but sedentary individuals to begin and continue running for substantial and attainable mortality benefits,” they conclude. Christopher Allen, senior cardiac nurse at the British Heart Foundation in the UK, says that many people do not manage to achieve the current recommendations for weekly physical activity, but he notes that this study shows how small amounts of exercise can go a long way. “What this study proves is that when it comes to keeping physically active, every step counts towards helping you main-tain a healthier heart,” he says. “Breaking your exercise down into 10-minute chunks can make this goal much more achievable and can help prolong your life by reducing your risk of dying from cardiovascular disease.”

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Source: http://www.medicalnewstoday.com

Provided by Rebecca McGonigle of the Valley Schools Employee Benefits Trust (VSEBT) in the August 2014 Wellstyles Monthly Newsletter.

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Benefits of Drinking Water When You First Wake Up

Posted by × November 28, 2013 at 10:16 am

Takeaway: One of the best things you can do after you wake up: drink at least 16oz (500mL) of water. Water fires up your metabolism, hydrates you, helps your body flush out toxins, gives your brain fuel, and may even make you eat less.
Estimated Reading Time: 2 minutes, 3s.

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If you like this article you might also dig this productivity experiment I just finished up: The top 10 things I learned drinking only water for a month.

Imagine not drinking any water, tea, or any other liquids for the next eight hours.

Well, that’s essentially what you do while you sleep. While you sleep, your body slowly becomes dehydrated because it needs fluid to operate. Naturally, you don’t drink water while you sleep because, well, you’re sleeping!

I’m reducing my body fat from 17% to 10% for a productivity experiment, and drinking a huge glass of water right after I wake up is something both my personal trainer and dietician recommended to reduce my body fat. Especially this week, when I’m being a complete slob in the name of productivity, it’s helping my energy levels a ton.

189795_6601Most sources I’ve read recommend drinking 16oz of water right after you wake up, and I’d recommend even more (depending on your weight; I drink 1-2L every morning and weigh 173 pounds). Here are five solid reasons to drink a big glass of water right when you wake up.

  • It fires up your metabolism. Drinking a large, cool glass of water after you wake up has been shown to fire up your metabolism by a whopping 24% for 90 minutes!1
  • You’re dehydrated when you wake up. You just went 7-8 hours without drinking any water! Even if your body isn’t telling you that it’s thirsty, it probably is.
  • Water helps your body flush out toxins. “Your kidneys do an amazing job of cleansing and ridding your body of toxins as long as your intake of fluids is adequate”, according to Kenneth Ellner, an Atlanta-based dermatologist. Getting fluids into your body right after your wake up will help your body flush out toxins first thing in the morning.2
  • Your brain tissue is 75% water. When you’re not properly hydrated, your brain operates on less fuel, and you can feel drained, or experience fatigue or mood fluctuations.3
  • You’ll eat less. One study showed that people who drink a glass of water before every meal lost 4.5 pounds over a three-month period, because “it fills up the stomach with a substance that has zero calories”, and people “feel full as a result”.4 Especially after I’ve eaten a big breakfast, drinking a lot of water in the morning has also helped me avoid the temptation of snacking before lunch.

Your body is 72% water, and you don’t have enough water in you when you wake up. Drinking a big glass of water first thing in the morning is a great way to rehydrate, and start kicking ass from the moment you wake up.

A great tip by S.J. Scott in the comments: if you’re not a fan of drinking water right after you wake up, reward yourself  after you drink the water (like with tea) to make the habit stick!

  1. Source: http://www.myfit.ca/foods_that_speed_metabolism.asp 
  2. Source: http://www.webmd.com/diet/features/6-reasons-to-drink-water?page=2 
  3. Source: http://www.dorchesterhealth.org/water.htm 
  4. Source: http://www.acs.org/content/acs/en/pressroom/newsreleases/2010/august/clinical-trial-confirms-effectiveness-of-simple-appetite-control-method.html 

Silent Killers of Your Metabolism

Silent Killers of Your Metabolism

March 27, 2014 | By

Your metabolism is responsible for turning calories into energy. A slow metabolism can lead to a build-up of calories, stored as fat for later use. Ultimately, this leads to unwanted weight gain and, if unchecked, obesity. In the following infographic, Rockwell Nutrition highlights a number of factors that are wreaking havoc on your metabolism.

– See more at: http://infographicjournal.com/silent-killers-of-your-metabolism/#sthash.rBhHvbLt.dpuf

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