Madison School District Supports Chris-Town Health Clinics

– See more at: http://www.madisonaz.org/chris-town-health-clinics-october-30-500-pm-700-pm/#sthash.h1uBwx01.dpuf

CHRIS-TOWN HEALTH CLINICS

OCTOBER 30 @ 5:00 PM7:00 PM

EVENT NAVIGATION

Is your child sick? Don’t have medical insurance? Our School-Based Health Centers are the solution for your family!

We can assist to enroll your uninsured children ages 4-18 to receive basic primary health care services in our School-Based Health Centers Program. Our program also offers preventative and restorative dental services for children enrolled ages 4-18. Come and see if your children are eligible!

¿Está su hijo enfermo? ¿Su hijo no tiene seguro médico?

¡Nuestros Centros de Salud En las Escuelas Primarias es la solución para su familia!

Le ayudaremos a inscribir a sus hijos, de edad 4 a 18 para recibir servicios básicos de atención de salud en nuestro programa. Nuestro programa también ofrece servicios dentales preventivos y de restauración para los niños inscritos, edades 4 a 18. ¡Venga a ver si sus hijos son elegibles!

DETAILS

Date:
October 30
Time:
5:00 pm – 7:00 pm

ORGANIZER

Abrazo Health
Phone:
602-246-5597

VENUE

Legacy Foundation Chris-Town YMCA
5517 N. 17th Avenue, Phoenix, AZ85015 United States

+ Google Map

Phone:
602-404-9622

Thank you to Sheri Gilbert at the Valley Schools Employee Benefits Trust (VSEBT) for bringing this press release and information to our attention.

Peoria Unified School District Holds Healthy Harvest Wellness Fair

In its continuing effort to support healthy staff, students and community members, the Peoria Unified School District (PUSD) held a Healthy Harvest Wellness Fair on October 22nd.  This is their 3rd Annual event, not only raising health and wellness awareness, but providing free screenings to attendees and raising funds for helping local healthcare.

Kudos to PUSD for their ongoing efforts to help health and wellness in Arizona.

Thanks to:  Christie Davis, Employee Benefits &  Compensation Manager at PUSD; Julie Padelford, and Sheri Gilbert of the Valley Schools Employee Benefits Trust (VSEBT) for providing information on this event.

Science had Great News for those Who Read Books!

Books

It’s no secret that reading is good for you. Just six minutes of reading is enough to reduce stress by 68%, and numerous studies have shown that reading keeps your brain functioning effectively as you age. One study even found that elderly individuals who read regularly are 2.5 times less likely to develop Alzheimer’s than their peers. But not all forms of reading are created equal.

The debate between paper books and e-readers has been vicious since the first Kindle came out in 2007. Most arguments have been about the sentimental versus the practical, between people who prefer how paper pages feel in their hands and people who argue for the practicality of e-readers. But now science has weighed in, and the studies are on the side of paper books.

Reading in print helps with comprehension. 

A 2014 study found that readers of a short mystery story on a Kindle were significantly worse at remembering the order of events than those who read the same story in paperback. Lead researcher Anne Mangen of Norway’s Stavanger University concluded that “the haptic and tactile feedback of a Kindle does not provide the same support for mental reconstruction of a story as a print pocket book does.”

Our brains were not designed for reading, but have adapted and created new circuits to understand letters and texts. The brain reads by constructing a mental representation of the text based on the placement of the page in the book and the word on the page.

The tactile experience of a book aids this process, from the thickness of the pages in your hands as you progress through the story to the placement of a word on the page. Mangen hypothesizes that the difference for Kindle readers “might have something to do with the fact that the fixity of a text on paper, and this very gradual unfolding of paper as you progress through a story is some kind of sensory offload, supporting the visual sense of progress when you’re reading.”

While e-readers try to recreate the sensation of turning pages and pagination, the screen is limited to one ephemeral virtual page. Surveys about the use of e-readers suggest that this affects a reader’s serendipity and sense of control. The inability to flip back to previous pages or control the text physically, either through making written notes or bending pages, limits one’s sensory experience and thus reduces long-term memory of the text.

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Reading long sentences without links is a skill you need — but can lose if you don’t practice. 

Reading long, literary sentences sans links and distractions is actually a serious skill that you lose if you don’t use it. Before the Internet, the brain read in a linear fashion, taking advantage of sensory details to remember where key information was in the book by layout.

As we increasingly read on screens, our reading habits have adapted to skim text rather than really absorb the meaning. A 2006 study found that people read on screens in an “F” pattern, reading the entire top line but then only scanning through the text along the left side of the page. This sort of nonlinear reading reduces comprehension and actually makes it more difficult to focus the next time you sit down with a longer piece of text.

Tufts University neuroscientist Maryanne Wolf worries that “the superficial way we read during the day is affecting us when we have to read with more in-depth processing.” Individuals are increasingly finding it difficult to sit down and immerse themselves in a novel. As a result, some researchers and literature-lovers have started a “slow reading” movement, as a way to counteract their difficulty making it through a book.

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Reading in a slow, focused, undistracted way is good for your brain.

Slow-reading advocates recommend at least 30 to 45 minutes of daily reading away from the distractions of modern technology. By doing so, the brain can reengage with linear reading. The benefits of makingslow reading a regular habit are numerous, reducing stress and improving your ability to concentrate.

Regular reading also increases empathy, especially when reading a print book. One study discovered that individuals who read an upsetting short story on an iPad were less empathetic and experienced less transportation and immersion than those who read on paper.

Reading an old-fashioned novel is also linked to improving sleep. When many of us spend our days in front of screens, it can be hard to signal to our body that it’s time to sleep. By reading a paper book about an hour before bed, your brain enters a new zone, distinct from that enacted by reading on an e-reader.

Three-quarters of Americans 18 and older report reading at least one book in the past year, a number which has fallen, and e-books currently make up between 15 to 20% of all book sales. In this increasingly Twitter- and TV-centric world, it’s the regular readers, the ones who take a break from technology to pick up a paper book, who have a serious advantage on the rest of us.

Low-Carb Beats Low-Fat for Weight Loss, Study Says

For people who want to lose weight and boost their heart health, cutting down on carbohydrates may work better than trimming dietary fat, a new study suggests.  In a small clinical trial of obese adults, researchers found that those assigned to follow a low-carbohydrate diet lost more
weight over a year than those who followed a low-fat plan. They also had bigger improvements in their cholesterol and triglyceride levels, the research teams reports.

“On average, they lost 8 pounds more, and lost more body fat mass,” said researcher Dr. Tian Hu, a doctoral fellow at Tulane University School of Public Health in New Orleans. And while some experts have raised concerns that low-carbohydrate diets could be less than heart-healthy, these findings suggest otherwise, said Dr. Lydia Bazzano, who also worked on the study. “Low-carb diets have traditionally been seen as potentially risky,” said Bazzano, a professor of nutrition research at Tulane.

low

Yet in this study, people on the low-carb diet saw slightly greater improvements in their levels of “good HDL cholesterol and triglycerides— another type of blood fat. That could have been due to the bigger weight loss, Hu said, or to the greater amounts of “good” unsaturated fat in their diets.  But he also noted that the study ran for just one year, and it’s not clear how people on either diet would fare in the long run.

There are other caveats, too, according to a dietitian who was not involved in the study.  For one, people on the low-carbohydrate diet didn’t stick to it all that well. The regimen called for no more than 40 grams of carbohydrates a day—the equivalent of about two slices of bread. But, by the end of the year, people in the low-carbohydrate group were averaging 127 grams of carbohydrates a day, noted Sonya Angelone, a spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. “I do think that most people eat too many carbohydrates,” she said. So eating fewer
carbohydrates, and choosing high quality ones—fruits, vegetables, beans and whole grains—is a sound idea, according to Angelone.

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But one of the concerns with a low-carbohydrate diet, she said, is that people will not get enough fiber.  A high-fiber diet can help ward off heart disease, and studies suggest it can aid weight loss by making people feel more full. So instead of lowering carbohydrates “too much,” Angelone
said, why not replace refined carbs—like white bread and pasta— with fiber-rich foods?

The current study included 148 adults who were obese but free of diabetes and heart problems. About half were randomly assigned to a
low-carbohydrate diet, while the rest were placed on a low-fat plan.  People in both groups had counseling sessions with a dietitian: The low
-fat group was told to get no more than 30% of their daily calories from fat, while the low-carbohydrate group was given a limit of 40 grams
of carbohydrates per day. At the end of one year, the low-fat group averaged nearly 200 grams of carbohydrate daily compared to about 130
for the low-carb group, according to the study.  In the end, 82% of the low-fat group stuck with the diet for a full year.  The same was true for 79% of the low-carbohydrate group.

lowcarblifestyle

 

By the one-year mark, people in the low carbohydrate group had lost an average of almost 12 pounds. That compared with only four pounds for the low-fat group. According to Hu, the findings do not mean low-carb is the “best” diet for weight loss.  But, he said, “I think this means it’s a good option.” Bazzano acknowledged, though, that many of the study participants didn’t strictly follow their prescribed low-carbohydrate plan. “It was more moderate than that,” she said. And she agreed that being “careful” about the amount and type of carbohydrates you eat is key—as opposed to setting a rigid carbohydrate limit.

Angelone also pointed to another issue with the study: Sedentary study participants were discouraged from taking up exercise, to isolate the effects of the diet changes. But in real life, people would ideally change their diets and exercise. “Muscles use carbohydrates as fuel,” Angelone said. “it can be hard to exercise on a low-carb diet.”  Plus, she added. People on the low-fat diet, who were eating more carbohydrates, might have shed more weight if they’d been exercising.

Everyone agreed that there is no one-size-fits all diet. When it comes to heart health, for example, there is strong evidence that the Mediterranean diet—high in “good” carbohydrates and heart-healthy fats like olive oil—is a smart option.  Ultimately, people need to make
diet changes they can keep up for the long haul—not just until they lose a certain amount of weight.  The pounds will come back if you go back to your old ways, Angelone said.

Source:  WebMD, Inc.

Provided by Rebecca McGonigle of the Valley Schools Employee Benefits Trust (VSEBT) in the October 2014 Wellstyles Monthly Newsletter.

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Omega-3s in Diet May Help Ward Off ALS

A diet rich in omega-3 fatty acids may help cut your risk for the fatal neuro-degenerative disease amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), also known as Lou Gehrig’s disease, a new study suggests. These fatty acids—found most commonly in certain fish—are known to help reduce inflammation and oxidative stress on cells. Both of those processes can damage nerve tissue, according to the study authors. Inflammation and oxidative stress have long been linked with ALS, the study authors said, so any nutrient that fights those processes might be helpful.
In the study, “individuals with higher dietary intake of total omega-3 poly-unsaturated fatty acids—an essential type of dietary fat found in vegetable oils and fish—had a reduced risk for ALS,” said lead researcher Kathryn Fitzgerald of the Harvard School of Public Health in Boston. “We also found that higher dietary intake of alphalinolenic acid, a type of fatty acid found in vegetable oils and nuts, is also associated with lower ALS risk,” she said.

Omega-3-Foods

For the study, Fitzgerald’s team looked at the association between ALS and these fatty acids among almost 1,000 ALS patients. They found that those who ate the most foods containing omega-3 fatty acids had the lowest risk of devel-oping ALS. People ranked in the top 20% in terms of their omega-3 fatty acids intake cut their odds of developing ALS by a third, com-pared to those in the bottom 20%, the study found. Fitzgerald cau-tioned, however, that the study was an observational study, where the researchers look at data from published sources and not from their own randomized trial. “So we can’t say there’s a cause-and-effect relationship, only that there’s an association,” she said. And there was another caveat: This study only looked at the risk of developing ALS. Whether high intake could help treat people who already have the disease isn’t known. “Future studies are needed to establish whether increasing omega-3 intake might be helpful for people with ALS,” Fitzgerald said.

Print

ALS is a relatively rare disease, she noted. “Currently, there are roughly 20,000 to 30,000 Americans who have ALS, and roughly 5,000 patients are diagnosed with ALS each year,” Fitzgerald said.

Dr. Michael Swash is a British neurologist at the Royal London Hospital and the author of an ac-companying journal editorial. He believes that the new study “is important in that it provides the possibility of an environmental factor [diet] in the complex processes triggering the onset of ALS.” Dietary factors could be such a factor, and this research opens the door a little toward addressing that idea, Swash said. “Maybe we are headed toward two forms of therapy—one preventing the disorder, an ideal solution—the other slowing the progression of the disease, also necessary,” he said.

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Source:  WebMD, Inc.

Provided by Rebecca McGonigle of the Valley Schools Employee Benefits Trust (VSEBT) in the October 2014 Wellstyles Monthly Newsletter.

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7 THINGS HEALTHY PEOPLE DO EVERY MORNING

7 Things Healthy People Do Every Morning

My alarm is set to the song “Happy” by Pharrell Williams. It’s impossible to not smile when this song plays. This, combined with the other habits below, set the tone for a productive, happy and healthy day.

1. Drink A Glass Of Water As Soon As You Wake Up

This rehydrates your body, revs up your digestive system, and gets things flowing. You may notice positive changes like clearer skin and better digestion. Bonus points if you add a squeeze of fresh lemon juice or a teaspoon of apple cider vinegar.

2. Do Not Check Your Email Or Phone For At Least An Hour

Do you sleep with your cell phone next to you and grab for it first thing when you wake? This is not a good habit. If you choose to resist the temptation to check your email and Facebook feed until at least an hour after waking up, you’ll find that your mind is more clear, focused and happy.

3. Think Of One Thing For Which You Have Gratitude

This sets the stage for positivity throughout the day. If you come up with three or five things, even better.

4. Step Outside And Take A Deep Breath

Fill your lungs with fresh air. Even if it’s cold outside. This only takes 10 seconds! It reminds you that you are alive and breathing.

5. Move Your Body

You don’t necessarily have to do an intense workout before breakfast, but moving your body even a little is a great way to get the blood flowing and shake the body into wake-up mode. Simply doing a few stretches is a great option. Or turn on your favorite song and dance like no one is watching.

6. Take Time To Eat A Healthy Breakfast

Rather than reaching for a box of cereal, focus on getting real foods in your body. Eggs, soaked oats, and smoothies are all great options. (And they really don’t take that much time to prepare.) Try it out.

7. Say Your Affirmations

Look into the mirror and say something positive to yourself. Some ideas:

  • I radiate beauty, confidence and grace.
  • Every cell in my body is healthy and vibrant.
  • I feel great when I take care of myself.

So are you up for the challenge of incorporating these healthy habits? What about you? What helps you start the day off right?