June is National Men’s Health Month

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Men’s Health Month is celebrated across the country. The goal of this national observance is to increase awareness about the preventable health problems in men and promote early detection and treatment of disease among boys and men. This month gives healthcare providers, friends, family, and the media a chance to encourage men to seek regular medical advice for disease and screenings. Please see list of exams below:
  • Physical Exam. Needed every year or more often if recommended by your provider. Please talk to your healthcare practitioner to determine how often you should get an exam.
  • Testicular Exam. As the number one cancer for men between 15-35 years of age it is important to check your-self frequently and discuss an exam with your doctor during your physical exam.
  • Blood Pressure Screenings. Needed every 2 years unless it is elevated than it may need to be checked more frequently. Please talk to your healthcare practitioner to determine how often you should be screened.
  • Cholesterol Screenings. Needed every 5 years unless it is elevated than it may need to be checked more frequently. Please talk to your healthcare practitioner to determine how often you should be checked. Please talk to your healthcare practitioner to determine how often you should be screened.
  • Diabetes Screenings. Needed if your blood pressure is above 135/80, you have a BMI of over 25 in addition to other risk factors, or you have an out of range glucose or A1C reading. Please talk to your healthcare practitioner to determine how often you should be screened.
  • Dental Exam. Needed 1-2 times per year. Please talk to your healthcare practitioner to determine how often you should get an exam.
  • Eye Exam. Needed every 2 years or more often if recommended by your provider. Please talk to your healthcare practitioner to determine how often you should get an exam.
See what activities are going on in your community that relate to this month and don’t forget to wear blue on the Friday before Father’s day (6/16) to support the cause.
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National Cancer Survivors Day is June 4th

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National Cancer Survivors Day is June 4th
Whether you are still in treatment or have been cancer free for years, take some time on June 4th to celebrate National Cancer Survivor day. There are more than 15.5 million children and adults that have survived cancer. By 2026, it is estimated by the American Cancer Society that this number will increase to 20.3 million; almost 10 million males and 10.3 million females. The treatment for cancer can vary for individuals however, this can be a very physically and mentally draining process for everyone involved. To see more cancer survivor facts or information go to www.cancer.org.

Distracted Driving Awareness Month

Distracted driving can come in many forms – texting, talking on the phone, listening to music, being tired, taking a picture, sending an e-mail, using an App, or even talking to a passenger ALL while driving.
Because technology continues to advance, the rate of distracted driving goes up. 
Thousands die every year due to distracted driving and it can be 100% prevented. The National Safety Council reports that cell phone use while driving leads to 1.6 million crashes each year or 1 out of 4 car accidents. Pledge to drive cell free and share the distracted driving message with those around you.

March – Colon Cancer Awareness Mont

Colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer diagnosed for both men and women in the United States.

The American Cancer Society estimates that there will be over 95,000 new cases of colon cancer and almost 40,000 cases of rectal cancer in 2017.  The risk for developing colorectal cancer is 1 in 21 for men and 1 in 23 for women.

The rate of colorectal cancer has been steadily declining for both men and women due to the amount of screenings being done. Screenings detect any colorectal polyps that are present and are removed if necessary before they become cancerous.

As a result of more frequent and advanced screenings, there are now more than one millions survivors of colorectal cancer in the United States!

What you can do to be aware:

  • Get screened if you are between age 50-75 regularly
  • Be physically active
  • Maintain a healthy weight
  • Limit alcohol consumption
  • Don’t smoke

Quick Facts:

  • The risk for developing colorectal cancer increases with age.
  • More than 90% of colorectal cancer occurs in people aged 50 and older.
  • Precancerous polyps and colorectal cancer don’t always cause symptoms at first
  • The type and frequency of screenings can be different for everyone so consult your doctor about what is right for you.

Tech Savvy apps for your health

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Customer Review: by Donna92058
“I’ve found this app very useful & have used it many times. It’s great for those times you run out of ingredients, or when looking for a healthier alternative. Great job developers!”

Fooducate
Fooducate is a food coach that goes way beyond a simple calorie counter. Achieve your weight loss, health, and fitness goals by learning to eat REAL food.

True Food
Did you know that up to 70% of packaged foods on our supermarket shelves contain genetically modified (GM) ingredients? The True Food Shoppers Guide gives you valuable information on common GM ingredients, brands to look for—and look out for—and common sense tips to keep you in the know and help you find and avoid GM ingredients wherever you shop.

From your
Wellness Coordinator

Please feel free to contact me with suggestions, questions, comments or to have me come to your district to initiate a Wellness Challenge. I love to see people healthy and happy!

Yours truly,
Kendall Taylor
Valley Schools Wellness Coordinator

American Heart Month

Heart disease is the leading cause of death for men and women in the United States. The good news is that 80% of heart disease can be prevented when people make healthy choices and manage their health.  Read below about healthy strategies that can help prevent heart disease.

Monitor Your Blood Pressure. Keep your blood pressure below 120/80 mm Hg.

Get Active. The American Heart Association recommends 150 minutes of moderate intensity activity, 75 minutes of vigorous activity, or 10,000 steps/day to maintain a healthy heart.

Eat Heart Healthy. Eat a diet of fruits, vegetables, whole grains and healthy fats such as fish, avocado, and nuts. Limit sodium intake to 2,300mg/day or 1,500mg/day if you are at risk for a heart condition. Limit saturated fats and avoid trans fats as well as added sugars.

Maintain a Healthy Weight. Target a body mass index (BMI) of less than 25 or make sure that your muscle to fat ratio is within a healthy range.

Live Smoke Free. Smoking can put you at risk for cardiovascular disease. Contact ASHLine today for help quitting.

Watch Your Cholesterol. Keep your daily cholesterol under 200mg/dL per day and cut out Trans fats. You can find cholesterol in meat, cheese, and eggs.

Control Your Blood Sugar. Aim for a fasting blood glucose of less than 100mg/dL per day.