Distracted Driving Awareness Month

Distracted driving can come in many forms – texting, talking on the phone, listening to music, being tired, taking a picture, sending an e-mail, using an App, or even talking to a passenger ALL while driving.
Because technology continues to advance, the rate of distracted driving goes up. 
Thousands die every year due to distracted driving and it can be 100% prevented. The National Safety Council reports that cell phone use while driving leads to 1.6 million crashes each year or 1 out of 4 car accidents. Pledge to drive cell free and share the distracted driving message with those around you.

11 Sneaky Reasons Why You’re Always Tired

 

Are you consistently exhausted — even when you’re getting enough sleep? If so, there might be a few not-so-obvious reasons you’re so sluggish. Lucky for you, there are also a few pretty easy fixes!

1. YOU’RE NOT WAKING UP EARLY ENOUGH.

Take your hand away from the snooze-button. While it may seem counter-intuitive, sleeping until the last possible second might actually be harming you more than helping you! “Early to bed, early to rise, makes a (wo)man healthy, wealthy and wise” isn’t just a cute rhyme. You really do need to get up and take some time for yourself to de-stress before heading out for the day. Don’t believe us? A 2008 Harvard study showed that morning people better anticipate problems than night owls and are more proactive, which is linked to better job (and life) performance and success.

 2. YOU’RE SURROUNDED BY TOXIC PEOPLE.

Complaining coworkers and whining pals can actually make you tired. “People you allow into your life not only have the power to affect you emotionally, but can also take a toll on you physically,” explains Vicky Vlachonis, osteopath and author of The Body Doesn’t Lie. “If people that are cynical and tend to complain surround you, they can be draining your energy.” So how do you fix it? Vlachonis suggests getting “rid of time-wasters and move forward with feelings of positivity and gratitude — feelings of happiness bring your body lots of energy!”

3. YOUR SEX LIFE IS A SNOOZE.

Most people complain about being too tired to have sex, but guess what? Intimacy can actually help you get a better night’s rest. This is because an orgasm releases prolactin, which is naturally higher when we sleep. And if a morning quickie is more your style, there’s good news: Highly active sex can actually make you feel more energized than sleepy. So maybe stick to a more subdued session at night — or get frisky when you wake up!

4. YOU’RE MAGNESIUM-DEFICIENT.

Yes, it sounds weird, but think of magnesium “as the relaxation mineral,” explains Dr. Mark Hyman, director of the Cleveland Clinic Center for Functional Medicine. Why? It helps improves how effective your sleep is, how long it takes you to fall asleep, and how long you’re out, according to the National Institutes of Health. To make sure you’re getting a healthy dose, Jaclyn London, Nutrition Director at the Good Housekeeping Institute, suggests foods like nuts, seeds, beans, avocados, and leafy greens. (Note: Just remember that this magical mineral can sometimes have a laxative effect!)

5. YOU HATE YOUR JOB.

Let’s be honest: Waking up day in and day out for work already can take a toll, but that’s exacerbated when you hate what you do or are surrounded by challenging coworkers. If you’re always feeling sluggish, it may be that you need a change of office scenery. Need proof? Multiple studies have shown that people who hate their jobs have trouble falling asleep or sleeping deeply, mostly because of stress.

6. YOU’RE SKIPPING THE GYM.

If you’re in a slump, you may want to get moving. Regular physical activity can “reduce your risk of depression and may help you sleep better,” according to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention. It doesn’t take much: Just 150 minutes of moderate exercise a week can make you 65% less tired during the day!

7. YOU’RE NOT GETTING ENOUGH SUNLIGHT.

It’s all about the circadian rhythm. “When people are exposed to sunlight or very bright artificial light in the morning, their nocturnal melatonin production occurs sooner, and they enter into sleep more easily at night,” wrote M. Nathaniel Mead in an article in Environmental Health Perspectives. (This is also why you should shut off screens long before bed.) And while too much unprotected exposure can increase your risk of skin cancer, you should definitely aim to get an hour or two of sunlight each day. Bonus: Sunshine also offers a free dose of Vitamin D, which helps fight against diseases — and nothing brings your energy down like getting sick.

8. YOU’RE A BALL OF STRESS.

Everyone knows that anxiety isn’t good — especially because it causes ulcers, gray hair, and exhaustion. Stress is also the top cause of insomnia, according to the Mayo Clinic. And it’s a vicious cycle: The lack of sleep leaves you more irritable and anxious, making problems loom larger and it more difficult to sleep the next night. So take some time for you to de-stress, and try to put problems in perspective.

9. YOU MAY HAVE AN AUTO-IMMUNE DISORDER.

Yes, they are known to cause fatigue and tiredness, the U.S. Department of Health of Human Services reveals. And since women are three times more likely than men to suffer from one, be sure to speak to your doctor if you’re always tired. There may be a much deeper health issue that you’re not paying attention to.

10. YOUR BEDROOM IS A DISASTER.

If it’s a mess of clothes, shoes, and piles of papers, you’re not doing yourself or the quality of your sleep any favors. According to the National Sleep Foundation, your bedroom should be clean, comfortable, and conducive to rest. So, burn some scented candles (lavender will do!), use some dim lights, tidy up, and create your own calming sanctuary. Your brain will thank you.

11. YOU EAT TOO MUCH PROCESSED FOOD.

We’re talking about high-carb foods like burgers and fries, white rice, pasta, and bread, which usually cause a not-so-fun energy crash. Instead, you want to load up on fruits, veggies, whole grains, and lean protein, “which can boost energy by giving you the vitamins and minerals — not to mention antioxidants! — you need,” says London. “And since fruits and veggies are mostly water, the hydration may help give you a boost as well.”

From: Good Housekeeping

New ‘Fake Meat’ Smells, Tastes And Feels Like Meat, But Is Actually Made Entirely From Plants!

What would your reaction be if someone told you that the delicious steak you were gorging on was actually made of plants? No, I’m not talking about cheap (read: horrendous) substitutes like tofu, or those godforsaken nutri nuggets. This is actually ‘fake meat’.

beastburger_1449833704

Ethan Brown is the mind behind this. Founder and CEO of the startup ‘Beyond Meat’, Brown wants to manufacture fake meat by using patented technology, and plant products, eliminating animal slaughter, along with any other negatives that meat brings to the table.

m-11_1449833742

He realised that meat is nothing more than just a combination of amino acids, fats, carbohydrates, trace minerals and water. Convinced that he would only do epic stuff in life, and nothing else, he took the exact same nutrients from the plants and combined them to match the taste, texture and nutrition of real meat. Boss!

img_2349-1024x683_1449833815

1. But why avoid something as delicious as real meat? It’s the greatest ever, right?

Because it requires huge efforts and resources to get meat, he says. “Raising livestock is an incredibly inefficient way of producing protein. It takes a lot of land, a lot of energy, and a lot of water just to generate one pound of meat from an animal. About 30% of the animal is meat we eat; the rest is not useful.”

2. Manufacturing meat can solve a bunch of other issues like global warming, animal welfare, natural resources, and the alarming effects processed meat has on the health of humans.

3. Not to forget, it also addresses the concerns of people who have been fighting against the slaughter of animals.

While the company’s main plant is located in Missouri, it’s headquartered in El Segundo, California.

 

 

3. Not to forget, it also addresses the concerns of people who have been fighting against the slaughter of animals.
While the company’s main plant is located in Missouri, it’s headquartered in El Segundo, California.

meat-2_1449833769

In fact it worked so well at blind tastings that people really could not tell the difference. Even people like Bill Gates and the founders of Twitter got up and took notice of Beyond Meat. Bill Gates even went out to call it the future of food for humans. Writing a blog post describing his experience of having a Chicken Taco made from plants at Beyond Meat, he said – “Like most people, I don’t think I can be easily fooled. But that’s just what happened when I was asked to taste a chicken taco and tell whether the meat inside was real or fake. The meat certainly had the look and the smell of chicken. I took a bite and it had the taste and texture of real chicken, too. But I was surprised to learn that there wasn’t an ounce of real chicken in it. The ‘meat’ was made entirely of plants. And yet, I couldn’t tell the difference.”

bill-gates-and-2015-books_1449833921

This is something really cool, but none of us would actually believe how authentic it feels until we test it out on ourselves. Anyhoo, if this technology does work out, it will totally change the way the food industry functions.   Keeping our fingers crossed.

Children’s Eye Health Month

August is Children’s Eye Health and Safety Month promoting education and awareness about getting children’s eyes checked before they return to school.
Most children have healthy eyes, however there are certain conditions that can threaten good vision. Because it’s difficult to determine if the child is having any vision problems it’s important to bring them to their pediatrician regularly. Vision testing should typically start around the age of three.

Funny kid girl in glasses reading books

Funny kid girl in glasses reading books

Signs that may indicate a child has vision problems:

  • Wandering  or crossed eyes
  • Family history of vision problems
  • Disinterest in reading or viewing distant objects
  • Squinting or turning head in an unusual manner while watching television

More than 12 million children suffer from vision impairment in the United States while the leading cause of vision loss is due to eye injury.

There are an estimated 42,000 sports-related eye injuries every year and most are in adolescents.

Take some time this month to talk to others about the importance of regular eye exams for our youth.

Alcohol Awareness Month

Founded and sponsored by NCADD, Alcohol Awareness Month was established in 1987 to help reduce the stigma so often associated with alcoholism by encouraging communities to reach out to the American public each April with information about alcohol, alcoholism and recovery. Alcoholism is a chronic, progressive disease, genetically predisposed and fatal if untreated. However people can and do recover. In fact, it is estimated that as many as 20 million individuals and family members are living lives in recovery!

ncadd-logo
Alcohol Awareness Month provides a focused opportunity across America to increase awareness and understanding of alcoholism, its causes, effective treatment and recovery. It is an opportunity to decrease stigma and misunderstandings in order to dismantle the barriers to treatment and recovery, and thus, make seeking help more readily available to those who suffer from this disease.

alcohol-awareness-month-2013-BLOG-APRIL
Each April, NCADD’s National Network of Affiliates and other supporting organizations across the country will use this opportunity to address the Nation’s #1 public health problem through a broad range of media strategies, awareness campaigns, programs and events in their local communities.

Provided by Kendall Taylor of the Valley Schools Employee Benefits Trust (VSEBT) in their April 2016 Wellstyles Monthly Newsletter.

WellstylesNewsletteruntitled-2

This Infographic Tells You How To Best Use Herbs In Your Cooking

1 JULY 2014 1:00 AM
This Infographic Tells you How to Best Use Herbs in Your Cooking

Herbs are an essential part of cooking, but it isn’t always clear how to use them properly to enhance a recipe. This easy-to-read infographic tells you all about the major herbs and the best pairings for them.

This is a great place to start if you want to expand your cooking skills and experiment a bit. The infographic includes what types of foods go well with a particular herb, and which oils and other herbs are complementary. Some of these are obvious combinations (like chocolate and mint), but try some of the less obvious ones like ginger and dill, or basil and strawberries.

This Infographic Tells you How to Best Use Herbs in Your Cooking

Herb Guide to Cooking [Heiton Buckley via Visual.ly]

Colon Cancer – The Number 2 Cancer Killer

Colon_Cancer_infograph_3

 

Provided by Kendall Taylor of the Valley Schools Employee Benefits Trust (VSEBT) in their March 2016 Wellstyles Monthly Newsletter.

WellstylesNewsletteruntitled-2

 

3D-Printed Pathway Helps Nerve Growth

September 18, 2015 | by Kristy Hamilton

A 3D-printed nerve pathway

photo credit: A 3D-printed nerve regeneration pathway in a test subject. University of Minnesota College of Science and Engineering

3D printing has some amazing possibilities for architecture and design, not the least of which is engineering personalized tissue – in this case, printing a personalized nerve scaffold for your post-injury healing.

This innovation is not necessarily new; others have also attempted to 3D-print nerve guides. However, it is the culmination of these efforts that may eventually see its way to a hospital near you. If so, the treatment has the potential to aid more than 200,000 people a year who experience some sort of nerve injury or disease.

The process may be aptly suited for this field of medicine because nerves do not regenerate much after injury – if growth happens at all, it is usually slow and limited. Current treatment options include surgical procedures such as grafts or nerve guidance conduits, which are essentially tiny tubes that direct nerve endings toward each other.

This printing technology takes a slightly different approach: After 3D scanning a rat’s sciatic nerve, the researchers used a custom-built 3D printer to make silicone guides for nerve regeneration. These 3D-printed nerve pathways were embedded with biochemical cues to promote growth.

The final 3D-printed product was then implanted into rats with severed nerves. In about 10 to 12 weeks’ time, the rats experienced improved walking ability. The advantage of this technology is that precise shapes can be printed to suit the patient, rather than a one-tube-fits-all approach. The study is published in Advanced Functional Materials.

What sets this experiment apart, according to the researchers, is that it shows regrowth for a non-linear, complex nerve. The sciatic nerve is Y-shaped with both sensory and motor branches.

“This represents an important proof of concept of the 3D printing of custom nerve guides for the regeneration of complex nerve injuries,” said lead author Michael McAlpine, a professor of mechanical engineering at the University of Minnesota, in a statement.

One day in the future, he said, it may even be possible to make a “library” of scanned nerves from volunteers or cadavers to create close matches in situations where a nerve can’t be scanned.

McAlpine adds, “Someday we hope that we could have a 3D scanner and printer right at the hospital to create custom nerve guides right on site to restore nerve function.”

The Anti-Alzheimer’s Diet How the ‘MIND Diet’ Could Reduce Your Risk of Dementia

ALZHEIMER’S DISEASE ARTICLES
The Anti-Alzheimer’s Diet
How the ‘MIND Diet’ Could Reduce Your Risk of Dementia
By Diane Wedner, Lifescript Health Writer
Published June 15, 2015
Reviewed by Edward C. Geehr, M.D., Lifescript Chief Medical Officer

What you eat may lower your risk of getting Alzheimer’s disease. We tell you which foods are included in the “MIND diet” and give you 7 recipes you’ll love…

Here’s a simple way to lower your risk of getting Alzheimer’s disease: Eat a “brain-healthy” diet of leafy greens and berries, according to a March 2015 study published in the journal Alzheimer’s & Dementia.

The “MIND diet” is a hybrid of the heart-healthy Mediterranean diet and the DASH diet, which was developed by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to reduce high blood pressure. (MIND stands for Mediterranean-DASH Intervention for Neurodegenerative Delay.)

It encourages eating plant-based foods, limits high-fat edibles and focuses on ingredients known to protect the brain, such as blueberries, strawberries and leafy green vegetables.

The plan, developed at Rush University Medical Center in Chicago, is based on the results from a study of 923 people between ages 58 and 98, from 2004 to 2013.

Those who stuck to the MIND diet had the best result: They were 53% less likely to develop Alzheimer’s, says nutritional epidemiologist Martha Clare Morris, Ph.D., the study’s lead author. Participants who ate 1 to 2 servings of green leafy vegetables daily had less cognitive loss, on average, than those who ate fewer greens, Morris notes.
Even participants who stayed with the MIND diet moderately well saw benefits and were 35% less likely to develop Alzheimer’s, she says.

“It was about the equivalent of being 11 years younger,” she says.

Though diet can help, there are no sure ways to prevent Alzheimer’s, an incurable brain condition affecting more than 3.2 million women and 1.8 million men in the U.S., mostly over age 65, according to the Alzheimer’s Association. It leads to memory and cognitive problems that get progressively worse; it can be fatal.

However, a nutritious diet and healthy lifestyle that includes regular exercise may help protect your brain health over time, according to the National Institute on Aging.

The MIND diet meal plan includes:
Green leafy vegetables: 3 servings daily

Other vegetables: 3 servings every day of 1 salad and 1 other vegetable

Nuts: daily snack

Berries: 1 serving at least twice a week

Beans: 1 serving every other day

Whole grains: 3 daily servings

Fish: at least once a week

Poultry: at least once a week

Olive oil: daily

Wine: limit to 1 glass per day

Foods to avoid:

Red meat

Butter and stick margarine

Cheese

Pastries and sweets

Fried or fast food

Want to add brain-friendly foods to your diet? Start with these 7 easy-to-make recipes:

Wheat Berry Salad with Red Fruit
Serves: 6
Preparation time: 20 minutes

For this sweet and tart salad, wheat berries are blended with cranberries, apples and pecans and tossed in a raspberry vinaigrette – a winning combination. Serve over a bed of peppery arugula for lunch or a light supper.

Ingredients
⅓ cup freshly squeezed orange juice
⅓ cup dried cranberries
3 cups cooked wheat berries (recipe follows)
1 large Fuji apple, unpeeled, diced
½ cup pecan halves, toasted (see Tip) and coarsely chopped
3 tablespoons raspberry vinegar

3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
¼ teaspoon salt
¼ teaspoon freshly ground pepper

Preparation
1. Combine orange juice and cranberries in a small bowl. Let stand for 15 minutes.

2. Combine wheat berries, apple and pecans in a large bowl; stir gently. Drain the cranberries, reserving the juice. Stir the cranberries into the wheat berry mixture.

3. Whisk the reserved orange juice, vinegar and oil in a small bowl until combined. Season with salt and pepper. Pour over the salad and stir gently to coat. Refrigerate for at least 30 minutes to allow the flavors to combine. Serve cold or at room temperature.

Tip:
To toast pecan halves, spread nuts on a baking sheet and bake at 350°F, stirring once, until fragrant, 7 to 9 minutes.

Nutrition Facts
Per serving:
316 calories
14 g fat (2 g saturated)
0 mg cholesterol
42 g carbohydrate
7 g protein
6 g fiber
365 mg sodium
96 mg potassium
Nutrition Bonus: vitamin C (15% Daily Value)

Strawberry, Melon & Avocado Salad
This composed salad makes a cool kickoff for dinner or as a nutrition-packed lunch on its own. Nutty and slightly sweet sherry vinegar is a natural partner for strawberries.

Serves: 4
Preparation time: 20 minutes

Ingredients
¼ cup honey
2 tablespoons sherry vinegar or red-wine vinegar
2 tablespoons finely chopped fresh mint
¼ teaspoon freshly ground pepper
Pinch of salt
4 cups baby spinach
1 small avocado (4-5 ounces), peeled, pitted and cut into 16 slices
16 thin slices cantaloupe (about ½ small cantaloupe), rind removed
1½ cups hulled strawberries, sliced
2 teaspoons sesame seeds, toasted

Preparation
1. Whisk honey, vinegar, mint, pepper and salt in a small bowl.

2. Divide spinach among 4 salad plates. Arrange alternating slices of avocado and cantaloupe in a fan on top of the spinach. Top each salad with strawberries, drizzle with dressing, and sprinkle with sesame seeds.

Nutrition Facts
Per serving:
202 calories
8 g fat (1 g saturated, 5 g monosaturated)
0 mg cholesterol
34 g carbohydrate
3 g protein
7 g fiber
90 mg sodium
Nutrition Bonus: vitamin C, vitamin A, folate

Indian-Spiced Chicken Pitas

Preparation time: 30 minutes
Serves: 4

Here’s a perfect summer supper meal: spice-rubbed grilled chicken breasts, tucked into whole-wheat pitas stuffed with fresh vegetables and tangy yogurt sauce.

Ingredients
1 pound boneless, skinless chicken breasts, trimmed
1½ teaspoons garam masala, (see Tip), divided
¾ teaspoon kosher salt, divided
1 cup thinly sliced seeded cucumber
¾ cup nonfat plain yogurt
1 tablespoon chopped fresh cilantro, or mint
2 teaspoons lemon juice

Freshly ground pepper, to taste
4 6-inch whole-wheat pitas, warmed
1 cup shredded romaine lettuce
2 small or 1 large tomato, sliced
¼ cup thinly sliced red onion

Preparation
1. Preheat grill to medium-high or position rack in upper third of oven and preheat broiler. If grilling, oil the grill rack (see Tip). If broiling, coat a broiler pan with cooking spray.

2. Sprinkle chicken with 1 teaspoon garam masala and ½ teaspoon salt. Place the chicken on the grill rack or prepared pan and cook until it’s no longer pink in the center and an instant-read thermometer inserted into the thickest part registers 165°F. This should be 4 to 8 minutes per side, depending on the size of the breast. Transfer the chicken to a clean cutting board and let rest for 5 minutes.

3. Meanwhile, combine cucumber, yogurt, cilantro (or mint), lemon juice, the remaining ½ teaspoon garam masala and ¼ teaspoon salt and pepper in a small bowl. Thinly slice the chicken. Split open the warm pitas and fill with the chicken, yogurt sauce, lettuce, tomato and onion.

Tips:
Garam masala is a blend of spices used in Indian cooking. It’s available in the spice section of most supermarkets.

To oil a grill rack, oil a folded paper towel, hold it with tongs and rub it over the rack. (Do not use cooking spray on a hot grill.)

Nutrition Facts
Per serving:
333 calories
5 g fat (1 g saturated)
64 mg cholesterol
44 g carbohydrate
32 g protein
6 g fiber
637 mg sodium
485 mg potassium

Nutrition Bonus: vitamin C (35% Daily Value)

Seared Salmon with White Beans & Fennel
You could call this recipe triple-fennel salmon because it uses the fresh fennel bulb, the fronds and fennel seeds. The end result is melt-in-your-mouth, seared salmon fillets with an earthy bean topping. Add a mixed green salad to complete the meal.

Serves: 2
Preparation time: 35 minutes

Ingredients
3 teaspoons extra-virgin olive oil, divided
1 small bulb fennel, halved, cored and thinly sliced, plus 1 tablespoon chopped fennel fronds
1 15-ounce can white beans, rinsed
1 medium tomato, diced

¼ cup dry white wine
1½ teaspoons Dijon mustard
¼ teaspoon freshly ground pepper, divided
1 teaspoon fennel seed
8 ounces center-cut salmon fillet, skinned and cut into 2 portions

Preparation
1. Heat 1 teaspoon oil in a large nonstick skillet over medium heat. Add sliced fennel; cook, stirring occasionally, until lightly browned, about 6 minutes. Stir in beans, tomato and wine. Cook, stirring occasionally, until the tomato begins to break down, about 3 minutes. Transfer to a bowl; stir in chopped fennel fronds, mustard and 18 teaspoon pepper. Cover to keep warm.

2. Rinse and dry the pan. Combine fennel seed and the remaining 18teaspoon pepper in a small bowl; sprinkle evenly on both sides of salmon. Heat the remaining 2 teaspoons oil in the pan over medium-high heat until shimmering but not smoking. Add the salmon, skinned side up; cook until golden brown, 3 to 6 minutes. Turn the salmon over, cover and remove from the heat. Allow the salmon to finish cooking off the heat until just cooked through, 3 to 6 minutes more. Serve the salmon with the bean mixture.

Nutrition Facts
Per serving:
460 calories
21 g fat (4 g saturated, 10 g monosaturated)
67 mg cholesterol
39 g carbohydrate
34 g protein
13 g fiber
610 mg sodium
1589 mg potassium

Nutrition Bonus: vitamin C (50% Daily Value), potassium (45% DV), calcium, iron and vitamin A (20% DV), folate (18% DV)

Potato-Horseradish-Crusted Mahi-Mahi
This dish is dinner-party delicious, but simple enough for weekday meals. To save time, use precooked shredded potatoes, found in the refrigerated section of the produce department or where eggs are displayed.

Serves: 4
Preparation time: 25 minutes

Ingredients
1 cup precooked shredded potatoes
1 shallot, finely chopped
1 tablespoon prepared horseradish
1 teaspoon Dijon mustard
½ teaspoon garlic salt
¼ teaspoon freshly ground pepper
1¼ pounds mahi-mahi, skin removed, cut into 4 portions

4 teaspoons reduced-fat mayonnaise
1 tablespoon canola oil
1 lemon, quartered

Preparation
1. Combine potatoes, shallot, horseradish, mustard, garlic salt and pepper in a medium bowl. Spread each portion of fish with 1 teaspoon mayonnaise, then top with ¼ of the potato mixture, pressing the mixture onto the fish.

2. Heat oil in a large nonstick skillet over medium-high heat. Carefully place the fish in the pan potato-side down and cook until crispy and browned, 4 to 5 minutes. Gently turn the fish over, reduce the heat to medium and continue cooking until the fish flakes easily with a fork, 4 to 5 minutes more. Serve with lemon wedges.

Nutrition Facts
Per serving:
205 calories
6 g fat (1 g saturated, 3 g monosaturated)
105 mg cholesterol
9 g carbohydrate
27 g protein
1 g fiber
311 mg sodium
623 mg potassium

Nutrition Bonus: selenium (74% Daily Value)

Baja-Battered Fish
Fish tacos are fabulous. This recipe is a healthy version of the battered, deep-fried and crispy fish at Rossy’s Tacos in Baja California. The fish is best when served immediately, but it’ll keep, wrapped, in the refrigerator for up to one day.

Serves: 8
Preparation time: 40 minutes

Ingredients
¾ cup beer, preferably lager or pilsner
½ cup all-purpose flour
¼ cup whole-wheat pastry flour
½ teaspoon salt
¼ teaspoon dried oregano
¼ teaspoon dry mustard
¼ teaspoon cayenne pepper
¼ teaspoon freshly ground pepper

1¼ pounds tilapia or other firm white fish, sliced into ½-inch-by-2-inch strips 

3 tablespoons canola oil, divided

Preparation
1. Place beer, all-purpose flour, whole-wheat flour, salt, oregano, mustard, cayenne and pepper in a blender; blend until smooth, scraping down the sides as necessary. Transfer the batter to a shallow baking dish. Add fish, turning to coat all sides.

2. Heat 1 tablespoon oil in a large nonstick skillet over medium-high heat. Transfer one-third of the battered fish to the pan, placing each piece into a little oil. Cook until golden brown, 3 to 4 minutes per side. Transfer cooked fish to a plate; keep warm. Add 1 tablespoon oil and half the remaining fish to the pan; cook as directed above, reducing the heat if necessary. Cook the remaining fish with the remaining 1 tablespoon oil. Serve immediately.

Nutrition Facts
Per serving:
120 calories
6 g fat (0 g saturated, 3 g monosaturated)
33 mg cholesterol
4 g carbohydrate
11 g protein
0 g fiber
112 mg sodium
180 mg potassium

Berry-Banana Smoothie
There’s no more classic – or antioxidant-rich – combo than fresh berries and bananas. Here, just a touch of honey shines up their flavors even more.

Serves: 2
Preparation time: 5 minutes

Ingredients
1 ripe banana, sliced
½ cup raspberries
¼ cup blueberries
1½ teaspoons honey
18 teaspoon ground cinnamon
½ cup unsweetened apple juice
½ cup ice

Preparation
1. Place ingredients in the order listed in a blender. Pulse twice to chop the fruit, stir well, then blend until smooth. Serve immediately.

Nutrition Facts
Per serving:
126 calories
0 g fat
0 mg cholesterol
33 g carbohydrate
1 g protein
5 g fiber
4 mg sodium
338 mg potassium

Nutrition Bonus: vitamin C (25% Daily Value)

Connect with Us
Get more healthy food for thought – check out our posts on Health Bistroand Lifescript TV videos on YouTube. Plus, join the fun and conversation on Google+, Facebook, Twitter, and Pinterest.