Cholesterol Education Month

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September is National Cholesterol Education Month.  All Americans are encouraged to find time this month to get blood cholesterol checked and takes steps to learn more about how food and lifestyle choices can effect cholesterol levels.

Statistics. Over 102 million Americans (20 or older) have total cholesterol levels higher than 200mg/dL, which is above healthy levels and puts them at risk for heart disease (CDC).

Facts. Cholesterol is a waxy, fat-like substance that’s found in all cells of the body. Your body needs cholesterol to make hormones, vitamins, and other substances to help digest food. If there is too much cholesterol in the body, it can build up in your arteries putting you at risk for coronary heart disease.

Symptoms. Most people don’t have any symptoms. As a result, many people are unaware that their cholesterol levels are too high. Cholesterol levels can be easily detected through a blood draw and can be controlled through lifestyle changes and/or medications.

Getting Checked. The National Cholesterol Education Program recommends that adults 20 years or older have their cholesterol checked every 5 years. However, preventative guidelines for cholesterol screenings differ among adults especially if you have other risk factors such as obesity, smoking, high blood pressure, diabetes and a family history of coronary heart disease.

Know Your Numbers. The following are considered desirable cholesterol levels according to the CDC.

 Total Cholesterol: Less than 180mg/dL

LDL (bad) Cholesterol: Less than 110mg/dL

HDL (good) Cholesterol: 35mg/dL or higher

Triglycerides: Less than 150mg/dL

Center for Disease Control 

Good Fat vs. Bad Fat

“Good” fats—monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats can help lower LDL (bad) cholesterol and increase your HDL (good) cholesterol.

“Bad” fats—saturated and Trans fats increase your risk for heart disease and increase your LDL and total cholesterol.

GoodFatvsBadFat (1)

Provided by Kendall Taylor of the Valley Schools Employee Benefits Trust (VSEBT) in their September 2015 Wellstyles Monthly Newsletter.

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Eggs – Healthy to Eat?

Eggs were for a long time considered terrible for you because of the cholesterol.  While it is true they are high in cholesterol, more recent studies show that the cholesterol they contain is not absorbed completely by humans, reducing the risk.  Still further studies show they may be healthy for you.  The studies are mixed, but in the interest of showing the positive side which is either the small end or the big end if you are from Lilliput…  Here is a recent study.

 

Scramble back to eggs! Forget those high cholesterol warnings, they’re healthier than ever, say experts

By SOPHIE BORLAND
UPDATED: 05:39 EST, 14 February 2011

 

Good egg: The high cholesterol content which previously made eggs a health risk is now much lower compared to ten years agoGood egg: The high cholesterol content which previously made eggs a health risk is now much lower compared to ten years ago

If you’re eyeing up your breakfast options and fancy going to work on an egg, there’s no need to hold back.

For after years of telling us to shun them as an everyday food, the health police now say that eggs have become better for us.

The cholesterol content of eggs – which was previously believed to be a health risk – is now much lower compared with ten years ago, a study  suggests.

Eggs also contain more vitamin D, which helps protect the bones, preventing diseases such as osteoporosis and rickets.

The reason eggs have become more nutritious over the past decade is that hens are no longer fed bone meal, which was banned in the Nineties following the BSE crisis, the researchers claim. Instead the birds are normally given a mixture of wheat, corn and high-protein formulated feed, which makes their eggs more wholesome.

A U.S. government study found that modern eggs contain 13 per cent less cholesterol and 64 per cent more vitamin D compared with a decade ago.

This is backed by British research which shows that a medium-sized egg contains about 100mg of cholesterol, a third of the 300mg recommended daily limit.

Hen diet: Researchers claim that the reason that eggs have become so nutritious in the past decade is that hens eat more healthily since bone meal was banned in the 1990s following the BSE crisisHen diet: Researchers claim that the reason that eggs have become so nutritious in the past decade is that hens eat more healthily since bone meal was banned in the 1990s following the BSE crisis

Andrew Joret, deputy chairman of the British Egg Industry Council, whose firm Noble Foods made the findings, said: ‘We believe the reduction is due to changes in the feeds used in British plants since the Nineties when the use of bone meal was banned.’

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Two years ago Canadian researchers claimed that eggs actually helped lower blood pressure.

They suggested that when eggs are digested they produce proteins that mimic the action of powerful blood pressure-lowering drugs, known as Ace inhibitors.

A recent Surrey University study found eating one or two eggs for breakfast could help with weight loss as the high protein content makes us feel fuller longer.

The study, which involved volunteers eating two eggs a day for 12 weeks, also found that none had raised cholesterol.

In the Sixties many Britons ate up to five eggs a day but by the Nineties this had dropped to two or three a week – in part due to warnings about high cholesterol levels.

Charles Saatchi, husband of TV chef Nigella Lawson, recently claimed to have lost five stone by eating eggs for breakfast, lunch and dinner.

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-1356614/Eggs-Forget-high-cholesterol-warnings-theyre-healthier-ever.html#ixzz29XqDYi00
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