Healthy Inside-Out Easter Eggs

Inside-Out Easter Eggs

These deviled eggs put the color inside the egg, not outside, with the addition of beets to a classically creamy yolk filling. Look for precooked, peeled beets in the produce section.

 

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Ingredients:

8 large eggs

1 medium beet, cooked, peeled and quartered

1/4 cup mayonnaise

2 tsp Dijon mustard

1/2 tsp fine sea salt

1/4 tsp ground black pepper

3 TBS chopped fresh chives

16 very small fresh mint leaves or 2 tsp thinly sliced fresh mint leaves

Method

Place eggs in a large saucepan and cover by a few inches with water. Cover and place over medium-high heat and bring to a boil. Remove from heat and allow to sit, covered, 10 minutes. Drain, cool and peel eggs.

Halve eggs lengthwise. Scoop out yolks and place them in a food processor along with beet, mayonnaise, mustard, salt and pepper. Process until smooth, stopping frequently to scrape down sides of the bowl. Add chives and pulse until combined. Pipe or spoon the yolk mixture into the egg whites and place them on a plat-ter. Top each with a whole mint leaf or a sprinkling of sliced mint leaves.

Source: http://www.wholefoodsmarket.com/recipes

Provided by Rebecca McGonigle of the Valley Schools Employee Benefits Trust (VSEBT) from the April Wellstyles Monthly Newsletter.

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8 Foods You Should Eat Daily for Optimum Health

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Our tech nerdie, aka Kelly’s husband, is useful beyond words. In addition to keeping us online and in business by keeping up with all of our technical work, he also scans the web for articles that would be of interest to us. This is one of the articles he sent me last month which I think every Beauty Snob should read! I eat most of the items on the list but am now more diligent about all of it. I believe in eating only fresh foods (I do not even own a can opener and am planning to rid of my microwave!) and have raised my soon to be three year old son to love spinach and broccoli. With so many of our friends diagnosed with cancer I feel like the least we can do is control what we put in our bodies. Being youthful and beautiful is just a small perk to the health benefits you’ll receive.

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1. Spinach – It may be green and leafy, but spinach is also the ultimate man food. This noted biceps builder is a rich source of plant-based omega-3s and folate, which help reduce the risk of heart disease, stroke, and osteoporosis. Bonus: Folate also increases blood flow to the penis. And spinach is packed with lutein, a compound that fights age-related macular degeneration. Aim for 1 cup fresh spinach or ½ cup cooked per day. SUBSTITUTES: Kale, bok choy, romaine lettuce FIT IT IN: Make your salads with spinach; add spinach to scrambled eggs; drape it over pizza; mix it with marinara sauce and then microwave for an instant dip. PINCH HITTER: Sesame Stir-Braised Kale Heat 4 cloves minced garlic, 1 Tbsp. minced fresh ginger, and 1 tsp. sesame oil in a skillet. Add 2 Tbsp. water and 1 bunch kale (stemmed and chopped). Cover and cook for 3 minutes. Drain. Add 1 tsp. soy sauce and 1 Tbsp. sesame seeds.

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2. Yogurt – Various cultures claim yogurt as their own creation, but the 2,000-year-old food’s health benefits are not disputed: Fermentation spawns hundreds of millions of probiotic organisms that serve as reinforcements to the battalions of beneficial bacteria in your body, which boost the immune system and provide protection against cancer. Not all yogurts are probiotic though, so make sure the label says “live and active cultures.” Aim for 1 cup of the calcium– and protein-rich goop a day. SUBSTITUTES: Kefir, soy yogurt FIT IT IN: Yogurt topped with blueberries, walnuts, flaxseed, and honey is the ultimate breakfast—ordessert. Plain low-fat yogurt is also a perfect base for creamy salad dressings and dips. HOME RUN: Power Smoothie Blend 1 cup low-fat yogurt, 1 cup fresh or frozen blueberries, 1 cup carrot juice, and 1 cup fresh baby spinach for a nutrient-rich blast.

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3. Tomatoes – There are two things you need to know about tomatoes: Red are the best, because they’re packed with more of the antioxidant lycopene, and processed tomatoes are just as potent as fresh ones, because it’s easier for the body to absorb the lycopene. Studies show that a diet rich in lycopene can decrease your risk of bladder, lung, prostate, skin, and stomach cancers, as well as reduce the risk of coronary artery disease. Aim for 22 mg of lycopene a day, which is about eight red cherry tomatoes or a glass of tomato juice. SUBSTITUTES: Red watermelon, pink grapefruit, Japanese persimmon, papaya, guava FIT IT IN: Pile on the ketchup and Ragú; guzzle low-sodium V8 and gazpacho; double the amount of tomato paste called for in a recipe. PINCH HITTER: Red and Pink Fruit Bowl Chop 1 small watermelon, 2 grapefruits, 3 persimmons, 1 papaya, and 4 guavas. Garnish with mint.

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4. Carrots – Most red, yellow, or orange vegetables and fruits are spiked with carotenoids—fat-soluble compounds that are associated with a reduction in a wide range of cancers, as well as reduced risk and severity of inflammatory conditions such as asthma and rheumatoid arthritis—but none are as easy to prepare, or have as low a caloric density, as carrots. Aim for ½ cup a day. SUBSTITUTES: Sweet potato, pumpkin, butternut squash, yellow bell pepper, mango FIT IT IN: Raw baby carrots, sliced raw yellow pepper, butternut squash soup, baked sweet potato, pumpkin pie, mango sorbet, carrot cake PINCH HITTER: Baked Sweet Potato Fries Scrub and dry 2 sweet potatoes. Cut each into 8 slices, and then toss with olive oil and paprika. Spread on a baking sheet and bake for 15 minutes at 350°F. Turn and bake for 10 minutes more.

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5. Blueberries – Host to more antioxidants than any other popular fruit, blueberries help prevent cancer, diabetes, and age-related memory changes (hence the nickname “brain berry”). Studies show that blueberries, which are rich in fiber and vitamins A and C, boost cardiovascular health. Aim for 1 cup fresh blueberries a day, or ½ cup frozen or dried. SUBSTITUTES: Açai berries, purple grapes, prunes, raisins, strawberries FIT IT IN: Blueberries maintain most of their power in dried, frozen, or jam form. PINCH HITTER: Açai, an Amazonian berry, has even more antioxidants than the blueberry. Mix 2 Tbsp. of açai powder into OJ or add 2 Tbsp. of açai pulp to cereal, yogurt, or a smoothie.

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6. Black Beans – All beans are good for your heart, but none can boost your brain power like black beans. That’s because they’re full of anthocyanins, antioxidant compounds that have been shown to improve brain function. A daily ½-cup serving provides 8 grams of protein and 7.5 grams of fiber, and is low in calories and free of saturated fat. SUBSTITUTES: Peas, lentils, and pinto, kidney, fava, and lima beans FIT IT IN: Wrap black beans in a breakfast burrito; use both black beans and kidney beans in your chili; puree 1 cup black beans with ¼ cup olive oil and roasted garlic for a healthy dip; add favas, limas, or peas to pasta dishes. HOME RUN: Black Bean and Tomato Salsa Dice 4 tomatoes, 1 onion, 3 cloves garlic, 2 jalapeños, 1 yellow bell pepper, and 1 mango. Mix in a can of black beans and garnish with ½ cup chopped cilantro and the juice of 2 limes.

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7. Walnuts – Richer in heart-healthy omega-3s than salmon, loaded with more anti-inflammatory polyphenols than red wine, and packing half as much muscle-building protein as chicken, the walnut sounds like a Frankenfood, but it grows on trees. Other nuts combine only one or two of these features, not all three. A serving of walnuts—about 1 ounce, or seven nuts—is good anytime, but especially as a postworkout recovery snack. SUBSTITUTES: Almonds, peanuts, pistachios, macadamia nuts, hazelnuts FIT IT IN: Sprinkle on top of salads; dice and add to pancake batter; spoon peanut butter into curries; grind and mix with olive oil to make a marinade for grilled fish or chicken. HOME RUN: Mix 1 cup walnuts with ½ cup dried blueberries and ¼ cup dark chocolate chunks.

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8. Oats – The éminence grise of health food, oats garnered the FDA’s first seal of approval. They are packed with soluble fiber, which lowers the risk of heart diseaseYes, oats are loaded with carbs, but the release of those sugars is slowed by the fiber, and because oats also have 10 grams of protein per ½-cup serving, they deliver steady muscle-building energy. SUBSTITUTES: Quinoa, flaxseed, wild rice FIT IT IN: Eat granolas and cereals that have a fiber content of at least 5 grams per serving. Sprinkle 2 Tbsp. ground flaxseed on cereals, salads, and yogurt. PINCH HITTER: Quinoa Salad Quinoa has twice the protein of most cereals, and fewer carbs. Boil 1 cup quinoa in a mixture of 1 cup pear juice and 1 cup water. Let cool. In a large bowl, toss 2 diced apples, 1 cup fresh blueberries, ½ cup chopped walnuts, and 1 cup plain fat-free yogurt.

– See more at: http://www.healthcare4me.net/8-foods-you-should-eat-daily-for-optimum-health/#sthash.8c3FCaxK.dpuf

Blueberries, Grapes and Apples Linked to Lower Risk of Diabetes

Blueberries, Grapes and Apples Linked to Lower Risk of Diabetes

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A large cohort study involving researchers from the U.S., U.K. and Singapore, which focused on individual fruit consumption and risk of diabetes, reveals that certain fruits—but not juices—may reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes in adults. The study pulled data from three studies: the Nurses’ Health Study )NHS 1984-2008), the Nurses’ Health Study II (NHS II 1991-2009) and the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study (HPFS 1986-2008).

In total, there were 187,382 participants, both men and women, who took part in the study, and participants who had diabetes, cardiovascular disease or cancer at the start were not included. The researchers used food frequency questionnaires every 4 years in order to analyze the participants’ diet, and ten fruits were used in the study: grapes or raisins; peaches, plums or apricots; prunes; bananas; cantaloupe; apples or pears; oranges; grapefruit; strawberries; blueberries. Additionally, fruit juice, such as apple, orange and grapefruit juice, was included.

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Over the course of the study, 6.5% of the participants developed diabetes, but the researchers found that consuming three servings per week of blueberries, grapes, raisins, apples or pears reduced the risk of type 2 diabetes by 7%. However, the results also showed that the greater amount of fruit juice an individual drank, the more their risk for type 2 diabetes increased.

In general, substituting fruit juice with whole fruits decreased this risk, but strawberries and cantaloupe were the exception to this finding. The researchers write in the study, “Individual fruits might not be equally associated with risk of type 2 diabetes in that fruits have highly variable contents of fiber, antioxidants, other nutrients, and phytochemicals that jointly may influence the risk.”

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They add that their results support current recommendations to eat more and a diverse range of whole fruits in order to prevent diabetes. Medical News Today recently reported that eating fruits, such as apples, pears and bananas, could cut your risk of abdominal aortic aneurysm.

Provided by Rebecca McGonigle, Wellstyles Newsletter, October 2013, Valley Schools Employee Benefits Trust (VSEBT).

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Eating Berries Benefits the Brain

Berries Benefit Brain By Clearing Toxic Protein Accumulation, Animal Study Finds

Posted: 04/27/2013 9:56 am EDT  |  Updated: 04/29/2013 10:51 am EDT

Berries Brain

Berries could play an important role in clearing the accumulation of toxic proteins in the brain, according to a new study in mice.

The research, presented at the Experimental Biology 2013 meeting, showed that the brains of rats that consumed berries for two months were better protected against radiation, which is meant to induce accelerated aging in the mice.

Specifically, researchers found that the berry consumption was linked with increased autophagy, which is the natural process the brain undergoes to clear out accumulation of toxic proteins. They noted that phytonutrients — plant chemicals — in berries may be responsible for this effect; berries are known to be high in anthocyanins.

Researchers said that the findings could be especially meaningful if they also apply to humans, since diseases like Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s disease involve accumulation of toxic proteins. The next step is a study, currently being conducted, on humans ages 60 to 75 to see if berries’ have the same sort of effect.

Even though the findings have yet to be published in a peer-reviewed journal — and thus should be considered preliminary — a past study from Harvard researchers showed that eating berries regularly could help slow cognitive decline in older people, HuffPost’s Catherine Pearson reported.

20 Super Foods You Need to Build Muscle & Lose Fat

20 Super Foods You Need to Build Muscle & Lose Fat

Jun 18th, 2008 by Mehdi |

To build muscle & lose fat, you need a variety of proteins, veggies, fruits, carbs, and healthy fats. Eating protein helps building & maintaining muscle. But it also helps fat loss: protein has a higher thermic effect than carbs/fats.

Eating fats also helps fat loss: your body holds fat if you don’t eat fats. Fruits & veggies contain vitamins & minerals, necessary for recovery from your workouts. And carbs fuel your muscles so you feel full of energy at the gym.

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Lots of you struggle to get these foods. Sometimes because you’re too busy or sometimes because you just lack information. This list will help you — 20 super foods you need to build muscle & lose fat.

1. Whole Eggs. Cheap & rich source of protein: 7g/egg. The yolk contains most nutrients: half the protein, vitamins A/D/E and cholesterol to naturally increase your testosterone levels.

Don’t worry about cholesterol in eggs. Dietary cholesterol isn’t bound to blood cholesterol. Read thisthisthis & this. If you have bad cholesterol, lower your body fat rather than throwing the yolk away.

2. Fish Oil. Reduces inflammation (joints/skin), lowers body fat and increases testosterone levels. You need 9000mg EPA/DHA per day. Since you’ll probably struggle to get that from eating fatty fish, consider a fish oil supplement.

3. Wild Salmon. One of the best sources of omega-3 fatty acids that also gets you 20g protein per 100g serving. Farm raised salmon is, however, omega-3 deficient: it’s corn/grain fed. Go with wild salmon.

4. Berries. Strong antioxidants that prevent cancer, heart & eye diseases. Any kind works: cranberries, raspberries, blackberries, blueberries, etc. Buy fresh or frozen berries and mix with oatmeal.

5. Yogurt. Contain bacteria that improve your gastrointestinal health. Don’t buy frozen yogurt or yogurt with added sugar and fruits at the bottom. Get plain low fat yogurt. Eat it with berries & flax seeds.

6. Flax Seeds. Source of fiber, protein & omega-3. Grind the flax seeds to get the most out of them. Take 1 tbsp with yogurt & berries before going to bed. Stay away from flax oil: it’s unstable and contains no fiber.

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7. Extra Virgin Olive Oil. 70% monounsaturated fats that protect against heart diseases and cancer. Add 1-2 tbsp olive oil to your salads. Buy Extra Virgin Olive Oil: it contains more polyphenols and tastes better.

8. Mixed Nuts. Contain mono- & polyunsaturated fats, proteins, fiber, vitamin E, zinc, potassium, magnesium, etc. Mixed nuts are caloric dense, great if you’re askinny guy who wants to gain weight.

Anything works: almonds, walnuts, cashews, hazelnuts, … Peanut butter also works as long as you buy natural peanut butter without added salts/sugars.

9. Red Meat. Protein, vitamin B12, heme iron, zinc, creatine, carnosine and even omega-3 if you eat grass-fed beef. Eat steaks & hamburgers from top round or sirloin. Read Dr. Lonnie Lowery’s article on Meat.

10. Broccoli. High in cancer-fighting phytochemicals and anti-estrogenic indoles. Broccoli is also high in soluble fiber and low calorie, helping fat loss. Eat othercruciferous vegetables for a change: cabbage, bok choy, cauliflower, kale, …

11. Spinach. One of the most alkaline foods. Spinach prevents muscle & bone loss, but also cancer and heart diseases because of its high nutrient profile. Try one of the spinach recipes I shared a while back.

12. Turkey. If you don’t believe saturated fat is good for you, try white turkey. The leanest beef has about 4.5g saturated fat/100g, while white turkey has close to 0g (that why it’s so dry). Eat turkey with spinach & quinoa.

13. Quinoa. South American “king of grains”. Quinoa is higher in fiber & protein than rice or oats, tastes a lot better and is gluten free. Buy the whiter grain, it’s better quality. Eat it post workout with meat & spinach.

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14. Oats. Reduce cholesterol, provide you with low-gi carbs for energy, and high in soluble fiber. Try this post workout shake of whey & oats.

15. Tomatoes. High in lycopene, which prevents cancer. The lycopene in tomato paste is 4 times more bioavailable than in fresh tomatoes. Have pizza or pasta with tomato sauce & olive oil post strength training.

16. Oranges. Vitamin C to fight diseases, magnesium to lower blood pressure, anti-oxidant beta-carotenes, etc. Quit drinking processed orange juice which often has added sugars. Eat oranges or make your own orange juice.

17. Apples. Pectin in apples helps weight loss by increasing satiety. Apples are also the strongest antioxidiant after cranberries (eat the peels). Unfortunately apples are one of the most pesticide-contaminated fruits. Go organic.

18. Carrots. Their huge vitamin A content improves eye-health, especially night vision. Carrots are also rich in fiber, low calorie and taste good, even raw.

19. Water. Your body holds water if you don’t drink enough. Drinking prevents water retention, helps muscle recovery and prevents dehydration from strength training. Get a brita filter and drink 2 cups of water with each meal.

20. Green Tea. Strong antioxidant and natural diuretic. Green tea also speeds up fat loss, prevents cancer and improves blood sugar & circulation. Drink green tea in the morning instead of coffee. Real green tea, not the teabags.

Putting it All Together. Eat proteins, veggies, fruits & fats every 3 hours. 2 cups water with each meal. Carbs post workout only. Junk food 10% of the time. Get stronger in the meanwhile and you’ll build muscle & lose fat.

Foods to Eat

 Foods to Eat

 

AUGUST 27, 2011 |  BY   |  HEALTH AND FITNESS  |

Acai 

This dark Brazilian superberry is found to have one of the highest antioxidant levels of any fruit in the world.   Dark colored berries have been known for their health benefits because of their Anthocynins (Vascular pigments) which give the acai its color.  These belong to a group of molecules called flavonoids.  Well, twelve additional flavonoids were found according to the Portuguese book “Açaí: Preparo, Composição e Melhoramento de Conservação” (Schauss et al. 2006a).  It also contains a rich amount of phytosterol which may reduce blood cholesterol.  In a 2006 University of Florida study, the Acai berry destroyed cultured human cancer cells.  Acai is increasing in popularity and can now be found in smoothies, juices, and other products.  But in order to get the most from the berry, it is best to buy a product that has been freeze-dried and prepared naturally.

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Pomegranate

Another high antioxidant superfruit, the pomegranate, makes many guest appearances in Greek mythology.  It contains high amounts of vitamin B5, and potassium.  It also contains punicalagians which scavenge free-radicals.  The pomegranate seed juice has been shown to reduce the risk of heart disease, the seed oil was effective in the proliferation of breast cancer cells in vitro, and may slow the development of prostate and colon cancer.  Drinking 8oz of 100% pure pomegranate juice a day is the most effective way to gain the benefits from the fruit.

Spinach
This veggie has a reputation of being a good source of iron.  But in 1937, it was found that the iron levels were high for a vegetable but significantly lower than once thought.  Popeye the Sailor’s favorite food is still high in vitamins K (which maintains bone health), A, C and magnesium.  It is also a good source of several antioxidants.  Spinach may also be good for your brain.  Some studies show that it may protect the brain from oxidative stress and may reduce the effects of age related brain decline.

Broccoli
As a part of the cabbage family, broccoli has many potent cancer fighting nutrients.  This mighty green veggie is usually boiled or steamed and possesses high amounts of selenium, vitamin C and soluble fiber.  Studies have found that boiling broccoli for more than 10 minutes may strip it of nutrients.  However, the same studies found that steaming, microwaving, and stir-frying will not rob the plant of its cancer fighting compounds.

Salmon
This trout with a keen since of smell may make you smarter.  DHA and EPA are important for brain function and salmon is a good source of both.  The salmon is also a good source of Omega-3 fatty acids and vitamin D.  It can also increase blood levels and heart rate which promotes cardiovascular health.  Norwegian researchers found that Omega-3 is better absorbed by eating salmon as opposed to Cod Liver Oil supplements.

Carrots
This root plant is widely used in juices and soups.  It is a monster in the ‘vitamin A league’ packing an amazing 686% of the daily recommended value for 1 cup (122grams) of carrots.  The carotenoids found in foods like carrots have been shown to lower blood sugar and promote colon health.

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Blueberries
Another fruit that can lower your risk of cancer and heart disease is the blueberry.  Along with being high in vitamin C and potassium, blueberries are anti-inflammatory.  Studies have also found that eating wild blueberries may slow down the effects of aging.

Bananas
This tropical fruit that grows in hanging bunches, is grown in over 107 countries.  Bananas are packed with vitamins and minerals but because of its remarkable potassium content, doctors recommend it for patients with high blood pressure or low potassium.  Another member of the banana family, the plantain, has a slightly higher vitamin and mineral content when cooked but is equal in fiber and protein.

Cantaloupes
This powerfully nutritious fruit named after a village in Italy has immense health benefits.  Cantaloupes have 112% the daily recommended vitamin C and 103% recommended vitamin A.  This extremely high amount of vitamin A is great for your vision health.  The combination of B complexes also makes it a good energy source.

Garlic
A member of the onion family, garlic is grown year round and has been used throughout history for culinary and medicinal purposes.  Commonly known for warding off vampires in European folklore, this root crop packs a punch against some serious conditions.  It has been well documented that the compounds of garlic have boost hydrogen sulfide to relax the arteries.  It can also help prevent strokes, heart attacks, and limit cancer growth according to a 2007 University of Alabama study.  Garlic is now found in supplement forms but researchers are finding great benefits of aged and fresh garlic as opposed to processed.

Wheat germ
The germ in wheat germ has nothing to do with bacteria but with the germination.  It is one of the most nutritious foods you can get your hands on and has more vitamins and minerals per ounce than any other fruit or vegetable on the planet.  With over 23 nutrients, the benefits of consuming wheat germ in some form seem endless.  It is also commonly used by athletes and bodybuilders for its muscle growing potential.  The many people who feel as though they are obtaining the benefits of this food by eating bread are mistaken.  Flour that has had the germ removed is commonly used to make white and most wheat breads.  It is most likely better to buy wheat germ and add it to pancakes, cereal, muffins, and other foods.

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Tea
This herb which is drunk after steeping in hot water, is the second most commonly drunk beverage in the world.  Tea has been used in Asia and India for thousands of years and is now being highly marketed in the western world.  Green and black teas are well known for their high antioxidants.  Tea has been known to normalize blood pressure and help prevent cardiovascular disease and diabetes by lowering blood-glucose activity.  It also has anti-carcinogenic, anti-mutagenic and anti-tumor properties.  If that isn’t enough for you, early lab test show that green tea may beneficial against bone inflammation related to arthritis and cartilage breakdown.

Leafy Dark Greens (Kale, Collard etc.)
When you take a bite out of that burger you might be thinking that you are getting your daily greens from the lettuce between those buns.  Actually, lettuce is only as nutritious as drinking a glass of water.  To get the most out of your greens you should partake in some or the darker members of the Brassica family.  Collard greens and kale are both high in calcium and beta-carotene. The  3,3′-Diindolylmethane found in these veggies has been found to modulate the innate immune response system in the body. They also contain Sulforaphane that prompts the liver to produce enzymes that help detoxifies cancer causing chemicals.

Beans and other Legumes
This family includes peas, lentils, soy nut, chickpeas, and lima beans.  Although many tend to avoid or neglect eating legumes, studies show that eating four or more servings a week can make a difference in your health.  A Nurse’s Health Study in 2006 showed that eating four or more serving per week as opposed to less than one lowered the chance of heart disease by 22 percent.

Beets
This hard skinned root vegetable has a sweet taste and has also been used in the past for making certain types of medicine.  Beets are rich in folate and B vitamins which are essential for tissue growth.  It is recommended that women who are pregnant consume high amounts of folate for the spine development of the infant.  The blood pressure reducing power of beet juice is unbelievable!  The American Heart Association journal Hypertension showed a reduction in high blood pressure of volunteers in just 1 hr after drinking 500mls of beet juice!  The reduction was more pronounced as time went on and lasted up to 24 hrs.

Onions
One of the oldest vegetables know to man, onions have been used in a variety of ways through the ages.  Along with garlic, onions have a side effect of halitosis (bad breath) but the advantage of eating it outweighs that derivative (at least for you).  In research that used data from Italian and Swiss cancer, studies showed the cancer preventing possibilities of onions.  The study found that those who consumed more onions per week protected against 7 different types of cancer. Onions also have been shown to have anti-inflammatory and anti-bacterial activity as well as lowering blood sugar.

Cranberries 
This vine fruit has been a staple in American and Canadian Thanksgiving for hundreds of years.  Now researchers are studying the health benefits of the little vine berry and finding that it may deserve to be called a superfruit.  Cranberries are excellent for digestive health and are high in antioxidants like its dark berry brothers. But there may be another unexpected advantage of cranberries.  It contains a chemical compound that can inhibit and even reverse plaque which can lead to tooth decay.  It’s harder now to find 100% cranberry juice. Most are a part of a cocktail because of cranberries’ tart taste.  Most supermarket brands stock cranberry mixed with apple, pineapple, grape, and other juices.

Oranges
Sometimes known as the Chinese apple, oranges originated from Southeast Asia.  It is well renowned for its very high vitamin C content.  Oranges also contain high dietary fiber and folate.  Many people believe that taking vitamin C supplements or drinking sugared drinks fortified with vitamin C has the same health benefits as drinking orange juice.  A recent Italian study proves otherwise.  Subjects were give three drinks to consume.  Blood-orange juice, fortified vitamin C water, and sugar water.  Then blood samples were taken and exposed to hydrogen peroxide.  The subjects who drank the orange juice showed 18% less damage to DNA after 3 hours.  Those who drank the fortified drink and sugar water showed no protection against DNA damage.

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Avocado
This fruit with a smooth and creamy flesh is grown widely throughout Central and South America.  Avocados have higher fiber content than any other fruit and are packed with 60% more potassium than bananas.  Avocados also help lower cholesterol and have been known to lower low-density lipoprotein (bad cholesterol) and raise high-density lipoprotein (good cholesterol).   You really need to get your hands on this fruit.  Try spreading it over bread, bagels, and crackers instead of butter and cream cheese.

Artichokes
Studies are being conducted to find out more about this Mediterranean perennial thistle.  We know about its phytonutrients which can lower cholesterol as a part of a healthy diet.  There have also been discoveries about the antioxidant contained in this food.  Artichoke extract may have a protective effect on liver cells and may reduce symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome

29 Healthy Foods

29 Healthiest Foods on the Planet

29 Health Foods

The following is a “healthy food hot list” consisting of the 29 food that will give you the biggest nutritional bang for you caloric buck, as well as decrease your risk for deadly illnesses like cancer, diabetes and heart disease. Along with each description is a suggestion as to how to incorporate these power-foods into your diet.

Fruits

Fresh Fruit Variety01. Apricots
The Power:  Beta-carotene, which helps prevent free-radical damage and protect the eyes. The body also turns beta-carotene into vitamin A, which may help ward off some cancers, especially of the skin. One apricot has 17 calories, 0 fat, 1 gram of fiber. Snacks on them dried, or if you prefer fresh, buy when still firm; once they soften, they lose nutrients.

02. Avocados
The Power:  Oleic acid, an unsaturated fat that helps lower overall cholesterol and raise levels of HDL, plus a good dose of fiber. One slice has 81 calories, 8 grams of fat and 3 grams of fiber. Try a few slices instead of mayonnaise to dress up your next burger.

03. Raspberries
The Power:  Ellagic acid, which helps stall cancer-cell growth. These berries are also packed with vitamin C and are high in fiber, which helps prevent high cholesterol and heart disease. A cup has only 60 calories, 1 gram of fat and 8 grams of fiber. Top plain low-fat yogurt or oatmeal (another high fiber food) with fresh berries.

05. Cantaloupe
The Power:  Vitamin C (117mg in half a melon, almost twice the recommended daily dose) and beta-carotene – both powerful antioxidants that help protect cells from free-radical damage. Plus, half a melon has 853mg of potassium – almost twice as much as a banana, which helps lower blood pressure. Half a melon has 97 calories, 1 gram of fat and 2 grams of fiber. Cut into cubes and freeze, then blend into an icy smoothie.

06. Cranberry Juice
The Power:  Helps fight bladder infections by preventing harmful bacteria from growing. A cup has 144 calories, 0 grams of fat and 0 fiber. Buy 100 percent juice concentrate and use it to spice up your daily H20 without adding sugar.

07. Tomato
The Power:  Lycopene, one of the strongest carotenoids, acts as an antioxidant. Research shows that tomatoes may cut the risk of bladder, stomach and colon cancers in half if eaten daily. A tomato has 26 calories, 0 fat and 1 gram of fiber. Drizzle fresh slices with olive oil, because lycopene is best absorbed when eaten with a little fat.

08. Raisins
The Power:  These little gems are a great source of iron, which helps the blood transport oxygen and which many women are short on. A half-cup has 218 calories, 0 fat and 3 grams of fiber. Sprinkle raisins on your morning oatmeal or bran cereal – women, consider this especially during your period.

09. Figs
The Power:  A good source of potassium and fiber, figs also contain vitamin B6, which is responsible for producing mood-boosting serotonin, lowering cholesterol and preventing water retention. The Pill depletes B6, so if you use this method of birth control, make sure to get extra B6 in your diet. One fig has 37 to 48 calories, 0 fat and 2 grams of fiber. (Cookie lovers – fig bars have around 56 calories, 1 gram of fat and 1 gram of fiber per cookie). Fresh figs are delicious simmered alongside a pork tenderloin and the dried variety make a great portable gym snack.

10. Lemons and Limes
The Power:  Limonene, furocoumarins and vitamin C, all of which help prevent cancer. A wedge has 2 calories, 0 fat and 0 fiber. Buy a few of each and squeeze over salads, fish, beans and vegetables for fat free flavor. See also: Beneficial Bytes: Lemons and Limes.

Vegetables

Vegetables11. Onions
The Power:  Quercetin is one of the most powerful flavonoids (natural plant antioxidants). Studies show it helps protect against cancer. A cup (chopped) has 61 calories, 0 fat and 3 grams of fiber. Chop onions for the maximum phytonutrient boost, or if you hate to cry, roast them with a little olive oil and serve with rice or other vegetables.

12. Artichokes
The Power:  These odd-looking vegetables contain silymarin, an antioxidant that helps prevent skin cancer, plus fiber to help control cholesterol. One medium artichoke has 60 calories, 0 fat and 7 grams of fiber. Steam over boiling water for 30 to 40 minutes. Squeeze lemon juice on top, then pluck the leaves off with your fingers and use your teeth to scrape off the rich-tasting skin. When you get to the heart, you have found the best part!

13. Ginger
The Power:  Gingerols may help reduce queasiness; other compounds may help ward off migraines and arthritis pain by blocking inflammation-causing prostaglandins. A teaspoon of fresh gingerroot has only 1 calorie, 0 fat and 0 fiber. Peel the tough brown skin and slice or grate into a stir-fry.

14. Broccoli
The Power:  Indole-3-carbinol and sulforaphane, which help protect against breast cancer. Broccoli also has lots of vitamin C and beta-carotene. One cup (chopped) has 25 calories, 0 fat and 3 grams of fiber. Don’t overcook broccoli – instead, microwave or steam lightly to preserve phytonutrients. Squeeze fresh lemon on top for a zesty and taste, added nutrients and some vitamin C.

15. Spinach
The Power:  Lutein and zeaxanthin, carotenoids that help fend off macular degeneration, a major cause of blindness in older people. Plus, studies show this green fountain of youth may help reverse some signs of aging. One cup has 7 calories, 0 fat and 1 gram of fiber. Add raw leaves to a salad or saute with a little olive oil and garlic.

16. Bok Choy (Chinese cabbage)
The Power:  Brassinin, which some research suggests may help prevent breast tumors, plus indoles and isothiocyanates, which lower levels of estrogen, make this vegetable a double-barreled weapon againstbreast cancer. A cup will also give you 158mg of calcium (16 percent of your daily recommended requirement) to help beat osteoporosis. A cup (cooked) has 20 calories, 0 fat and 3 grams of fiber. Find it in your grocer’s produce section or an Asian market. Slice the greens and juicy white stalks, then saute like spinach or toss into a stir-fry just before serving.

17. Squash (Butternut, Pumpkin, Acorn)
The Power:  Winter squash has huge amounts of vitamin C and beta-carotene, which may help protect against endometrial cancer. One cup (cooked) has 80 calories, 1 gram of fat and 6 grams of fiber. Cut on in half, scoop out the seeds and bake or microwave until soft, then dust with cinnamon.

18. Watercress and Arugula
The Power:  Phenethyl isothiocyanate, which, along with beta-carotene and vitamins C and E, may help keep cancer cells at bay. One cup has around 4 calories, 0 fat and 1 gram of fiber. Do not cook these leafy greens; instead, use them to garnish a sandwich or add a pungent, peppery taste to salad.

19. Garlic
The Power:  The sulfur compounds that give garlic its pungent flavor can also lower LDL (“bad”) cholesterol, lower blood pressure and even reduce your risk of stomach and colon cancer. A clove has 4 calories, 0 fat and 0 fiber. Bake a whole head for 15 to 20 minutes, until soft and sweet and spread on bread instead of butter.

Whole Grain Foods

Grains, Beans, Dairy and Nuts

20. Quinoa
The Power:  A half cup of cooked quinoa has 5 grams of protein, more than any other grain, plus iron, riboflavin and magnesium. A half-cup has 318 calories, 5 grams of fat and 5 grams of fiber. Add to soup for a protein boost. Rinse first, or it will taste bitter.

21. Wheat Germ
The Power:  A tablespoon gives you about 7 percent of your daily magnesium, which helps prevent muscle cramps; it is also a good source of vitamin E. One tablespoon has 27 calories, 1 gram of fat and 1 gram of fiber. Sprinkle some over yogurt, fruit or cereal.

22. Lentils
The Power:  Isoflavones, which may inhibit estrogen-promoted breast cancers, plus fiber for heart health and an impressive 9 grams of protein per half cup. A half-cup (cooked) has 115 calories, 0 fat and 8 grams of fiber. Isoflavones hold up through processing, so buy lentils canned, dried or already in soup. Take them to work, and you will have a protein packed lunch.

23. Peanuts
The Power:  Studies show that peanuts or other nuts (which contain mostly unsaturated “good” fat) can lower your heart-disease risk by over 20 percent. One ounce has 166 calories, 14 grams of fat and 2 grams of fiber. Keep a packet in your briefcase, gym bag or purse for a protein-packed post-workout nosh or an afternoon pick me up that will satisfy you until supper, or chop a few into a stir-fry for a Thai accent. See also: The Nut Case

24. Pinto Beans
The Power:  A half cup has more than 25 percent of your daily requirement of folate, which helps protect against heart disease and reduces the risk of birth defects. A half-cup (canned) has 103 calories, 1 gram of fat and 6 grams of fiber. Drain a can, rinse and toss into a pot of vegetarian chili.

25. Yogurt
The Power:  Bacteria in active-culture yogurt helps prevent yeast infections; calcium strengthens bones. A cup has 155 calories, 4 grams of fat, 0 grams of fiber. Get the plain kind and mix in your own fruit to keep calories and sugar down. If you are lactose intolerant, never fear — yogurt should not bother your tummy.

26. Skim Milk
The Power:  Riboflavin (a.k.a. vitamin B2) is important for good vision and along with vitamin A might help improve eczema and allergies. Plus, you get calcium and vitamin D, too. One cup has 86 calories, 0 fat and 0 fiber. If you are used to high fat milk, don’t go cold turkey; instead, mix the two together at first. Trust this fact: In a week or two you won’t miss it!

Seafood

Seafood27. Shellfish (Clams, Mussels)
The Power:  Vitamin B12 to support nerve and brain function, plus iron and hard-to-get minerals like magnesium and potassium. Three ounces has 126 to 146 calories, 2 to 4 grams of fat and 0 fiber. Try a bowl of tomato-based (and low fat) Manhattan clam chowder.

28. Salmon
The Power:  Cold-water fish like salmon, mackerel and tuna are the best sources of omega-3 fatty acids, which help reduce the risk of cardiac disease. A 3-ounce portion (cooked) has 127 calories, 4 grams of fat, 0 fiber. Brush fillets with ginger-soy marinade and grill or broil until fish flakes easily with a fork.

29. Crab
The Power:  A great source of vitamin B12 and immunity-boosting zinc. A 3-ounce portion has 84 calories, 1 gram of fat, 0 fiber. The “crab” in sushi is usually made from fish; buy it canned instead and make your own crab cakes. See also: Fish and Seafood Recipes

Medicinal Benefits of Whole Foods

Medicinal Benefits of Whole Foods

For the first 5000 years of civilization, humans relied on foods and herbs for medicine. Only in the past 50 years have we forgotten our medicinal “roots” in favor of patent medicines. While pharmaceuticals have their value, we should not forget the well-documented, non-toxic and inexpensive healing properties of whole foods. The following list is but a sampling of the health benefits from whole foods.

whole foods

 Apple. Lowers cholesterol and risk for cancer. Has mild antibacterial, anti-viral, anti-inflammatory estrogenic activity. High in fiber, helps avoid constipation, suppresses appetite. Juice can cause diarrhea in children.

Asparagus. A super source of the antioxidant glutathione, to lower cancer risk.

Avocado. Benefits circulation, lowers cholesterol, dilates blood vessels. It’s main fat, monounsaturated oleic acid (also concentrated in olive oil), acts as an antioxidant to block artery-destroying toxicity of bad-type-LDL cholesterol. One of the richest sources of glutathione, a powerful antioxidant shown to block thirty different carcinogens and to block proliferation of the AIDS virus in test tube experiments.

Banana and Plantain. Soothes the stomach. Good for dyspepsia (upset stomach). Strengthens the stomach lining against acid and ulcers. Has antibiotic activity.

Barley. Long known as a “heart medicine” in the Middle East. Reduces cholesterol. Has anti-viral and anti-cancer activity. Contains potent antioxidants, including tocotrienols.

Beans. (legumes, including navy, black, kidney, pinto, soy beans and lentils). Potent medicine in lowering cholesterol. One-half cup of cooked beans daily reduces cholesterol an average 10 percent. Regulates blood sugar levels. An excellent food for diabetics. Linked to lower rates of certain cancers. Very high in fiber. A leading producer of intestinal gas in most people.

Beets. Richer than spinach in iron and other minerals. The greens are helpful in cases of anemia, tuberculosis, constipation, poor appetite, obesity, tumors, gout, pimples and helpful in the elimination of irritating drug poisons. Beets are one of the best foods to relieve constipation and they are also good for obesity.

Bell Pepper. Rich in antioxidant vitamin C. Helps to fight off colds, asthma, bronchitis, respiratory infections, cataracts, macular degeneration, angina, atherosclerosis and cancer.

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Blueberry. Acts as an unusual type of antibiotic by blocking attachment of bacteria that cause urinary tract infections. Contains chemicals that curb diarrhea. Also has anti-viral activity and high in natural aspirin.

Broccoli. A unique package of versatile disease-fighters. Abundant in antioxidants, including quercetin, glutathione, beta carotene, indoles, vitamin C, lutein, glucarate, sulforaphane. Extremely high in cancer fighting activity, particularly against lung, colon and breast cancers. Like other cruciferous vegetables, it speeds up removal of estrogen from the body, helping suppress breast cancer. Rich in cholesterol-reducing.fiber. Has anti-viral, anti-ulcer activity. A super source of chromium that helps regulate insulin and blood sugar. Note: cooking and processing destroys some of the antioxidants and anti-estrogenic agents, such as indoles and glutathione. Most protective when eaten raw or lightly cooked.

Brussels Sprouts. Cruciferous family possesses some of the same powers as broccoli and cabbage. Definitely anti-cancer, estrogenic and packed with various antioxidants and indoles.

Cabbage (including bok choy). Revered in ancient Rome as a cancer cure. Contains numerous anti-cancer and antioxidant compounds. Speeds up estrogen metabolism, is thought to help block breast cancer and suppress growth of polyps, a prelude to colon cancer. Eating cabbage more than once a week cut men’s colon cancer odds 66 percent. As little as two daily tbsp. of cooked cabbage protected against stomach cancer. Contains anti-ulcer compounds; cabbage juice helps heal ulcers in humans. Has anti-bacterial and anti-viral powers. Can cause flatulence in some. Some of these important compounds are destroyed by cooking. Raw cabbage, as in cole slaw, appears to have stronger overall health value.

Carrot. A super source of beta carotene, a powerful anticancer, artery-protecting, immune-boosting, infection-fighting antioxidant with wide protective powers. A carrot a day slashed stroke rates in women by 68 percent. The beta-carotene in one medium carrot cuts lung cancer risk in half, even among formerly heavy smokers. High doses of beta carotene, as found in carrots, substantially reduces odds of degenerative eye diseases (cataracts and macular degeneration as well as chest pain (angina). The high soluble fiber in carrots depresses blood cholesterol and promotes regularity. Cooking can make it easier for the body to absorb carrot’s beta-carotene.

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Cauliflower. Cruciferous family member that contains many of the same cancer-fighting, hormone-regulating compounds as its cousins, broccoli and cabbage. Specifically thought to help ward off breast and colon cancers. Eat raw, or lightly cooked.

Celery. A traditional Vietnamese remedy for high blood pressure. Celery compounds reduce blood pressure in animals. Comparable human dose: two to four stalks a day. Also has a mild diuretic effect. Contains eight different families of anti-cancer compounds, such as phthalides and polyacetylenes, that detoxify carcinogens, especially cigarette smoke. Eating celery before or after vigorous exercise can induce mild to serious allergic reactions in some.

Chili Pepper. Helps dissolve blood clots, opens up sinuses and air passages, breaks up mucus in the lungs, acts as an expectorant or decongestant, helps prevent bronchitis, emphysema and stomach ulcers. Most of chili pepper’s pharmacological activity is credited to capsaicin (from the Latin “to bite”), the compound that makes the pepper taste hot. Also a potent painkiller, alleviating headaches when inhaled, and joint pain when injected. Hot paprika made from hot chili peppers is high in natural aspirin. Antibacterial, antioxidant activity. Putting hot chili sauce on food also speeds up metabolism, burning off calories. Chili peppers do not harm the stomach lining or promote ulcers.

Cinnamon. A strong stimulator of insulin activity, thus potentially helpful for those with Type 2 diabetes. Mild anti-coagulant activity.

Clove. Used to kill the pain of toothache and as an anti-inflammatory against rheumatic diseases. Has anti-coagulant effects, (anti-platelet aggregation), and its main ingredient, eugenol, is anti-inflammatory.

Coffee. Most, but not all, of coffee’s pharmacological impact comes from its high concentration of caffeine a psychoactive drug. Caffeine, depending on an individual’s biological makeup and peculiar sensitivity, can be a mood elevator and mental energizer. Improves mental performance in some. An emergency remedy for asthma. Dilates bronchial passages. Mildly addictive. Triggers headaches, anxiety and panic attacks in some. In excess, may cause psychiatric disturbances. Promotes insomnia. Coffee stimulates stomach acid secretions (both caffeinated and decaf). Can aggravate heartburn. Promotes bowel movements in many, causes diarrhea in others. Caffeine may promote fibrocystic breast disease in some women.

Collard Greens. Full of anti-cancer, antioxidant compounds, including lutein, vitamin C and beta carotene. In animals, blocks the spread of breast cancer. Like other green leafy vegetables, associated with low rates of all cancers.

Corn. Anticancer and antiviral activity, possibly induced by corn’s content of protease inhibitors. Has estrogen-boosting capabilities. A very common cause of food intolerance linked to symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis, irritable bowel syndrome, headaches and migraine-related epilepsy in children.

Cranberry. Strong antibiotic properties with unusual abilities to prevent infectious bacteria from sticking to the cells lining the bladder and urinary tract. Thus, it helps prevent recurring urinary tract (bladder) infections. Also has antiviral activity.

Cucumbers. Should be eaten freely by people who live on the desert or in other hot climates—the most cooling food. Indicated for fevers, constipation, skin eruptions, high blood pressure, rheumatism, obesity, acidosis and is a mild diuretic.

Date. High in natural aspirin. Has laxative effect. Dried fruits, including dates, are linked to lower rates of certain cancers, especially pancreatic cancer. Contains compounds that may cause headaches in susceptible individuals.

Eggplant. Eggplant substances, called glycoalkaloids, made into a topical cream medication have been used to treat skin cancers such as basal cell carcinoma, according to Australian researchers. Also, eating eggplant may lower blood cholesterol and help counteract some detrimental blood effects of fatty foods. Eggplant also has antibacterial and diuretic properties.

Fenugreek Seed. A spice common in the Middle East and available in many U.S. food markets. Has anti-diabetic powers. Helps control surges of blood sugar and insulin. Also anti-diarrheal, anti-ulcer, anti-diabetic, anti-cancer, tends to lower blood pressure, helps prevent intestinal gas.

Flax seeds and oil. Used primarily for constipation. In cases of gastritis, colitis or other inflammations of the digestive tract. Lowers blood fat levels often associated with heart attacks and strokes. Reduces harmful blood cholesterol levels with its soluble fibers. Prevents colon and breast cancer through its rich source of lignins, a documented anti-cancer agent. Improves moods, diminishes allergies and produces healthier skin.

Fig. Helps to prevent cancer. Both extract of figs and the fig compound, benzaidehyde, have helped shrink tumors in humans according to Japanese tests. Also laxative, anti-ulcer, antibacterial and antiparasitic powers. Triggers headaches in some people.

Fish and Fish Oil. An ounce a day has been shown to cut risk of heart attacks by 50 percent. The omega-3 oil in fish can relieve symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis, asthma, psoriasis, high blood pressure, Raynaud’s disease, migraine headaches, ulcerative colitis and, possibly, multiple sclerosis. May help ward off strokes. A known anti-inflammatory agent and anti-coagulant. Raises good type HDL cholesterol. Lowers triglycerides. Guards against glucose intolerance and Type 11 diabetes. Some fish are high in antioxidants, such as selenium and Coenzyme Q-10. Exhibits anti-cancer activity especially in blocking development of colon cancer and spread of breast cancer. Fish highest in omega-3 fatty acids include sardines, mackerel, herring, salmon, tuna.

Garlic. Used to treat an array of ills since the dawn of civilization. Broad-spectrum antibiotic that combats bacteria, intestinal parasites and viruses. In high doses it has cured encephalitis. Lowers blood pressure and blood cholesterol, discourages dangerous blood clotting. Two or three cloves a day cut the odds of subsequent heart attacks in half in heart patients. Contains multiple anti-cancer compounds and antioxidants and tops the National Cancer Institute’s list as a potential cancer-preventive food. Lessens chances of stomach cancer in particular. A good cold medication. Acts as a decongestant, expectorant, anti-spasmodic, anti-inflammatory agent. Boosts immune responses. Helps relieve gas, has anti-diarrheal, estrogenic and diuretic activity. Appears to lift mood and has a mild calming effect. High doses of raw garlic (more than three cloves a day) have caused gas, bloating, diarrhea and fever in some. Aged garlic may be better than cooked garlic. Eat garlic both raw and cooked for all-around insurance.

Ginger. Used to treat nausea, vomiting, headaches, chest congestion, cholera, colds, diarrhea, stomach ache, rheumatism, and nervous diseases. Ginger is a proven anti-nausea, anti-motion sickness remedy that matches or surpasses drugs such as Dramamine. Helps thwart and prevent migraine headaches and osteo-arthritis. Relieves symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis. Acts as an anti-thrombotic and anti-inflammatory agent in humans; is an antibiotic in test tubes (kills salmonella and staph bacteria), and an anti-ulcer agent in animals. Also, has anti-depressant, anti-diarrheal and strong antioxidant activity. High in anti-cancer activity.

ginger

Grape. Rich in antioxidant compounds. Red grapes (but not white or green grapes) are high in the antioxidant quercetin. Grape skins contain resveratrol, shown to inhibit blood-platelet clumping (and consequently, blood clot formation) and boost good-type HDL cholesterol. Red grapes are antibacterial and antiviral in test tubes. Grape seed oil also raises good-type cholesterol.

Grapefruit. The pulp contains a unique pectin (in membranes and juice sacs—not in juice) that lowers blood cholesterol and reverses atherosclerosis (clogged arteries) in animals. Has anticancer activity, and appears particularly protective against stomach and pancreatic cancer. The juice is antiviral and high in various antioxidants, especially vitamin C.

Honey. Strong antibiotic properties. Has sleep-inducing, sedative and tranquilizing properties. Use sparingly as it is high in sugar.

Kale. Rich source of various anti-cancer chemicals. Has more beta carotene than spinach and twice as much lutein, the most of any vegetable tested. Kale is also a member of the cruciferous family, endowing it with anti-cancer indoles that help regulate estrogen and fight off colon cancer.

Kiwi Fruit. Commonly prescribed in Chinese traditional medicine to treat stomach and breast cancer. High in vitamin C.

kiwi

Lecithin. Protects the nerves. Improves memory. May help thyroid and adrenal hypertension. Protects cells against damage by oxidation. Emulsifies fat in the blood.

Lemon. This citrus fruit ranks very high in its medicinal value, having many therapeutical uses. Lemon juice is a natural antiseptic which may be safely applied directly to cuts, bruises and infections. Lemon juice is good for asthma, headaches, pneumonia, and arthritis. It is a good general blood and body purifier and a mild diuretic. Do not take in cases of inflammations of the digestive tract. The juice also aids in the removal of old drug residues (poisons) from the body.

Licorice. Strong anti-cancer powers, possibly because of a high concentration of glycyrrhizin. Mice drinking glycyrrhizin dissolved in water have fewer skin cancers. Also kills bacteria, fights ulcers and diarrhea. May act as a diuretic. Too much licorice can raise blood pressure. Also it is not advised for pregnant women. Only real licorice has these powers. Licorice “candy” sold in the United States is made with anise instead of real licorice. Real licorice says “licorice mass.” Imitation licorice is labeled “artificial licorice” or “anise.”

Melon (green and yellow, such as cantaloupe and honeydew). Has anti-coagulant (blood-thinning) activity. Contains the antioxidant beta carotene.

Milk. Milk fat promotes cancer and heart disease. Milk is also an unappreciated terror in triggering “allergic” reactions that induce joint pain and symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis, asthma, irritable bowel syndrome and diarrhea. In children and infants milk is suspected to cause or contribute to colic, respiratory problems, sleeplessness, itchy rashes, migraines, epileptic seizures, ear infections and even diabetes. May retard healing of ulcers.

Mushroom (Asian, including shiitake). A longevity tonic, heart medicine and cancer remedy in Asia. Current tests show mushrooms, such as maitake, help prevent and/or treat cancer, viral diseases, such as influenza and polio, high blood cholesterol, sticky blood platelets and high blood pressure. Eaten daily, maitake or shiitake, fresh (three ounces) or dried (one-third ounce), cut cholesterol by 7 and 12 percent respectively. A shiitake compound, lentinan, is a broad-spectrum antiviral agent that potentiates immune functioning. Used to treat leukemia in China and breast cancer in Japan. Extract (sulfated B-glucans) has been declared by Japanese scientists more effective as an AIDS drug than the common drug AZT. Eating black (“tree ear’) mushroom “thins the blood.” No therapeutic effects are known for the common U.S. button mushroom. Some claim this species has cancer-causing potential (hydrazides) unless cooked.

Mustard (including horseradish). Recognized for centuries as a decongestant and expectorant. Helps break up mucus in air passages. A good remedy for congestion caused by colds and sinus problems. Also antibacterial. Increases metabolism, burning off extra calories. In one British test about three-fifths of a teaspoon of ordinary yellow mustard increased metabolic rate about 25 percent, burning forty-five more calories in three hours.

Nuts. Anti-cancer and heart-protective properties. A key food among Seventh-Day Adventists, known for their low rates of heart disease. Walnuts and almonds help reduce cholesterol, contain high concentrations of antioxidant oleic acid and mono-unsaturated fat, similar to that in olive oil, known to protect arteries from damage. Nuts generally are high in antioxidant vitamin E, shown to protect against chest pain and artery damage. Brazil nuts are extremely rich in selenium, an antioxidant linked to lower rates of heart disease and cancer. Walnuts contain ellagic acid, an antioxidant and cancer-fighter, and are also high in omega-3 type oil. Nuts, including peanuts, are good regulators of insulin and blood sugar, preventing steep rises, making them good foods for those with glucose intolerance and diabetes. Peanuts also are estrogenic. Nuts have been found lacking in the diets of those who later develop Parkinson’s disease. Prime cause of acute allergic reactions in susceptible individuals.

Oats. Can depress cholesterol 10 percent or more, depending on individual responses. Oats help stabilize blood sugar, have estrogenic and antioxidant activity. They also contain psychoactive compounds that may combat nicotine cravings and have anti-depressant powers. High doses can cause gas, abdominal bloating and pain in some.

Olive oil. Lowers bad LDL cholesterol without lowering good HDL cholesterol. Helps keep bad cholesterol from being converted to a toxic or “oxidized” form. Thus, helps protect arteries from plaque. Reduces blood pressure, helps regulate blood sugar. Has potent antioxidant activity. Best oil for kitchen cooking and salads.

Onion (including chives, shallots, scallions, leeks). Reputed in ancient Mesopotamia to cure virtually everything. An exceptionally strong antioxidant. Full of numerous anti-cancer agents. Blocks cancer dramatcally in animals. The onion is the richest dietary source of quercetin, a potent antioxidant (in shallots, yellow and red onions only-not white onions). Specifically linked to inhibiting human stomach cancer. Thins the blood, lowers cholesterol, raises good-type HDL cholesterol (preferred dose: half a raw onion a day), wards off blood clots, fights asthma, chronic bronchitis, hay fever, diabetes, atherosclerosis and infections. Anti-inflammatory, antibiotic, antiviral, thought to have diverse anti-cancer powers. Quercetin is also a sedative. Onions aggravate heartburn, may promote gas.

Orange. Natural cancer-inhibitor, includes carotenoids, terpenes and flavonoids. Also rich in antioxidant vitamin C and beta-carotene. Specifically tied to lower rates of pancreatic cancer. Orange juice protected mice sperm from radiation damage. Because of its high vitamin C, oranges may help ward off asthma attacks, bronchitis, breast cancer, stomach cancer, atherosclerosis, gum disease, and boost fertility and healthy sperm in some men. May aggravate heartburn.

Parsley. Anti-cancer because of its high concentrations of antioxidants, such as monoterpenes, phthalides, polyacetylenes. Can help detoxify carcinogens and neutralize certain carcinogens in tobacco smoke. Also, has diuretic activity.

Pineapple. Suppresses inflammation. A main constituent, an antibacterial enzyme called bromelain, is anti-inflammatory. Pineapple aids digestion, helps dissolve blood clots and is good for preventing osteoporosis and bone fractures because of its very high manganese content. It is also antibacterial and anti-viral and mildly estrogenic.

Plum. Antibacterial. Anti-viral. Laxative.

Potato (white). Contains anticancer protease inhibitors. High in potassium, thus may help prevent high blood -pressure and strokes. Some estrogenic activity.

Prune. A well known laxative. High in fiber, sorbitol and natural aspirin.

Pumpkin. Extremely high in beta carotene, the antioxidant reputed to help ward off numerous health problems, including heart attacks, cancer, cataracts.

Raspberry. Anti-viral, anti-cancer activity. High in natural aspirin.

Rice. Anti-diarrheal, anti-cancer activity. Like other seeds, contains anti-cancer protease inhibitors. Of all grains and cereals, it is the least likely to provoke intestinal gas or adverse reactions (intolerances) causing bowel distress such as spastic colon. Rice bran is excellent against constipation, lowers cholesterol and tends to block development of kidney stones.

Seaweed and Kelp (brown or Laminaria type seaweed). One of the best foods that you can eat in cases of hypo-thyroid. It is rich in many important minerals. Antibacterial and anti-viral activity in brown Laminaria type seaweed known as kelp. It kills herpes virus, for example. Kelp may also lower blood pressure and cholesterol. Wakame boosts immune functioning. Nori kills bacteria and seems to help heal ulcers. A chemical from wakame seaweed is a clot-buster, in one test twice as powerful as the common drug heparin. Most types of seaweed have anti-cancer activity. Might aggravate acne flare-ups.

Soybean. Rich in hormones, it boosts estrogen levels in post-menopausal women. Has anti-cancer activity and is thought to be especially antagonistic to breast cancer, possibly one reason rates of breast and prostate cancers are low among the Japanese. Soybeans are the richest source of potent protease inhibitors which are anti-cancer, anti-viral agents. Soybeans lower blood cholesterol substantially. In animals, soybeans seem to deter and help dissolve kidney stones.

Spinach. Tops the list, along with other green leafy vegetables, as a food most eaten by people who don’t get cancer. A super source of antioxidants and cancer antagonists, containing about four times more beta-carotene and three times more lutein than broccoli, for example. Rich in fiber that helps lower blood cholesterol. Some of it’s antioxidants are destroyed by cooking. Eat raw or lightly cooked.

Strawberry. Anti-viral, anti-cancer activity. Often eaten by people less likely to develop all types of cancer. Only eat organically grown. Strawberries have the highest amount of pesticide contaminates.

Sugar. Helps heal wounds when applied externally. Like other carbohydrates, sugar helps induce cavities. Also may be related to Crohn’s disease. Triggers rise in blood sugar and stimulates insulin production. One teaspoon of sugar is said to set the immune system back 3 ½ hours. Causes fatigue and adrenal weakness.

Sweet Potato (yams). A source of the antioxidant beta carotene, linked to preventing heart disease, cataracts strokes and numerous cancers. One half cup of mashed sweet potatoes contains about 23,000 international units (lUs) of beta carotene, according to Department of Agriculture figures.

Tea (including black, oolong and green tea, not herbal teas). Amazing and diverse pharmacological activity, mainly due to catechins. Tea acts as an anticoagulant, artery protector, antibiotic, anti-ulcer agent, cavity-fighter, anti-diarrheal agent, anti-viral agent, diuretic (caffeine), analgesic (caffeine), mild sedative (decaffeinated). In animals tea and tea compounds are potent blockers of various cancers. Tea drinkers appear to have less atherosclerosis (damaged, clogged arteries) and fewer strokes. Excessive tea drinking because of its caffeine could aggravate anxiety, insomnia and symptoms of PMS. Tea may also promote kidney stones because of its high oxalate content. Green tea, popular in Asian countries, is highest in catechins, followed by oolong and ordinary black tea, common in the United States. Green tea is considered most potent. One human study, however, found no difference in benefits to arteries from green or black tea.

Tomato. A major source of lycopene, an antioxidant and anti-cancer agent that intervenes in devastating chain reactions of oxygen free radical molecules. Tomatoes are linked in particular to lower rates of pancreatic cancer and cervical cancer.

Tumeric. Truly one of the marvelous medicinal spices of the world. Its main active ingredient is curcumin which gives turmeric its intense cadmium yellow color. Curcumin, studies show, is an anti-inflammatory agent on a par with cortisone, and has reduced inflammation in animals and symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis in humans. In other tests, it lowered cholesterol, hindered platelet aggregation (blood clotting), protected the liver from toxins, boosted stomach defenses against acid, lowered blood sugar in diabetics, and was a powerful antagonist of numerous cancer-causing agents. Anti-cancer activity.

tumeric

Watermelon. High amounts of lycopene and glutathione, antioxidant and anti-cancer compounds. Also mild anti-bacterial, anti-coagulant activity.

Wheat. High-fiber whole wheat, and particularly wheat bran, ranks as the world’s greatest preventives of constipation. The bran is potently anti-cancer. Remarkably, in humans, wheat bran can suppress that which can develop into colon cancer. Anti-parasitic. Ranks exceedingly high as a trigger of food intolerances and allergies, resulting in symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis, irritable bowel syndrome and neurological illnesses.

Yogurt (use only organic yogurt). Goat yogurt is preferred. An ancient wonder food, strongly antibacterial and anti-cancer. A cup or two of yogurt a day boosts immune functioning by stimulating production of gamma interferon. Also spurs activity of natural killer cells that attack viruses and tumors. A daily cup of yogurt reduced colds and other upper respiratory infections in humans. Helps prevent and cure diarrhea. A daily cup of yogurt with acidophilus cultures prevents vaginitis (yeast infections) in women. Helps fight bone problems, such as osteoporosis, because of high available calcium content. Acidophilus yogurt cultures neutralize cancer-causing agents in the intestinal tract. Yogurts with L bulgaricus and S. thermophilus cultures, both live and dead, blocked lung cancers in animals. Yogurt with live cultures is safe for people with lactose intolerance.

For more information see:

· Barilla, Jean, M.S., The Good Fats and Oils
· Carper, Jean, Food: Your Miracle Medicine
· Graves, W.H.,D.C., Medicinal Value of Natural Foods
· Hausman, Patti, M.S., Healing Foods
· Murray, Michael, N.D., The Healing Power of Foods

15 Fat-Burning Foods

Nutrition 101: Eat To Burn Fat

Your one-week, fat-burning meal plan, plus the 15 best fat-burning foods.

The 15 Best Fat-Burning Foods

1. Walnuts

All nuts do contain some amount of the omega-3 fat alpha-linolenic acid, but most only contain trace amounts.

The real fat hero in most nuts is mono-unsaturated fats. Walnuts are actually a rich source of omega-3s.

One ounce provides almost 3g of alpha-linolenic acid.

2. Ginger

Used for centuries to help relieve digestive upset/disturbances, ginger can also help reduce inflammation, boost blood flow to muscles and aid muscle recovery.

It has also has been shown to boost calorie burn when eaten.

3. Oatmeal

This very slow-digesting carb keeps blood sugar and insulin levels low, so fat burning can stay high.

In fact, research has shown that athletes who consume slow-digesting carbs in the morning burn more fat throughout the entire day and during workouts than those consuming fast-digesting carbs.

4. Avocado

The mono-unsaturated fats found in avocados are burned readily for fuel during exercise and actually encourage fat burning.

Avocados also contain a very interesting carb called mannoheptulose, a sugar that actually blunts insulin release and enhances calciumabsorption, both of which are critical for encouraging fat loss.

5. Salmon

This fish is one of the richest sources of the omega-3 essential fats EPA and DHA. Unlikeflaxseeds, which provide a type of omega-3 that has to be converted into EPA and DHA, salmonprovides your body a direct supply of them with no conversion required.

This way you know you’re getting a direct supply of the fats that turn on fat burning and block fat storage.

6. Soybeans (Edamame)

Soybeans are the direct origin of soy protein, which has been shown to build muscle as efficiently as other forms of protein like whey and beef.

Soy has also been shown to aid fat loss, possibly by decreasing appetite and calorie intake.

7. Water

This just may be your best ally in fighting bodyfat. Studies have shown that drinking 2 cups of cold water can boost metabolic rate by 30%.

It has been estimated that drinking about 2 cups of cold water before breakfast, lunch and dinner every day for a year can burn 17,400 extra calories, which translates into a little more than 5 pounds of bodyfat!

 

Water just may be your best ally in fighting bodyfat
Water just may be your best ally in fighting bodyfat. 

8. Flaxseeds

They contain the essential omega-3 fatty acid alpha linolenic acid. These omega-3 fats have been found to turn on genes that stimulate fat burning and turn off genes that increase fat storage.

9. Grapefruit

A study from the Scripps Clinic (San Diego, California) reported that subjects eating half of agrapefruit or drinking 8 oz of grapefruit juice three times a day while maintaining their normal diet lost an average of 4 pounds over 12 weeks – and some lost more than 10 pounds without even dieting!

Results were likely due to grapefruit’s ability to reduce insulin levels and to a chemical in grapefruit known as naringin, which prevents fat from being stored in the body.

10. Honey

Yes, it’s a sugar, but it’s fairly low on the glycemic index. Keeping insulin levels low and steady is critical for maintaining a fat-burning environment in your body.

Honey is also a rich source of nitric oxide (NO) metabolites; ultimately, that means it actually encourages fat release from the body’s fat cells

11. Peanut Butter

Another source of helpful mono-unsaturated fat that can actually aid fat loss. What’s funny is that many food manufacturers make low-fat peanut butters!

Of course, they replace these healthy mono-unsaturated fats with carbs, namely sugar. Avoid these and stick with natural peanut butters that don’t add the type of fat you surely want to avoid – trans fats.

12. Eggs

Yes, we listed eggs in the muscle-building foods. So how can it also be a fat-burning food?

Research supports the notion that those who start their day with eggs not only eat fewer calories throughout the day, but also lose significantly more bodyfat.

13. Chili Pepper Flakes

Hot peppers contain the active ingredient capsaicin, a chemical that can enhance calorie burning at rest as well as reduce hunger and food intake.

The boost in calorie burn is particularly enhanced when capsaicin is used with caffeine.

14. Broccoli

This fibrous carb doesn’t provide many net carbs or calories, but it can make you feel full – one reason why it’s a great food for getting lean.

Broccoli can make you feel full - one reason why it's a great food for getting lean
Broccoli can make you feel full – one reason why it’s a great food for getting lean. 

Broccoli also contains phytochemicals that can help enhance fat loss.

15. Olive Oil

Like avocados, olive oil is a great source of monounsaturated fats.

Not only do they lower levels of the “bad” type of cholesterol and improve cardiovascular health, but they’re also more likely to be burned as fuel, which means they’re less likely to be sticking around your midsection.

The Fat-Burning One-Week Meal Plan

The following plan is designed for a woman weighing 140 pounds. When trying to lose weight during a rigorous exercise program, a good rule of thumb is to shoot for an intake of about 12 calories per pound of bodyweight.

So for a 110-pound woman, total daily calories would be approximately 1,320; for a 150-pound woman, about 1,800. See muscleandfitnesshers.com for your supplements on workout days.

Monday

Nutrition:

Calories: 1,565
Protein: 185g
Carbs: 65g
Fat: 65g

18 foods that fight common ailments

18 foods that fight common ailments
Try healthy eats that help fight diabetes, heart disease, migraines and more.
Tue, Aug 09 2011 at 12:00 PM
leafy greens

POWER PLANTS: Vitamin-rich greens like bok choy can help prevent illness. (Photo: Philippe Put/Flickr)

Woman's Day logo
Did you know that falling asleep easier, preventing PMS and easing the aches and pains of arthritis could be as easy as stocking your kitchen with the right foods?
Take 47-year-old Sarah. When I first met her, she was 50 pounds overweight and had high cholesterol, high blood pressure and diabetes. Together we created a plan that incorporated the best foods into her diet. After just three months, Sarah’s cholesterol dropped by 60 points and she had lost 30 pounds. Even better, she was able to say goodbye to her diabetes and blood pressure meds!
Another client, Eleanor, had long suffered from debilitating migraines. But within two weeks of adding 1 to 2 cups of spinach to her diet daily and eliminating trigger foods (like cheese and wine), she saw a dramatic improvement.
These are just two stories that inspired my book, “Joy Bauer’s Food Cures,” which shows how you can radically improve your health with some simple nutrition upgrades. Obviously food can’t always take the place of medication, but it can be a part of your better-health solution. Here, some of my best findings. Dig in!
What’s ailing you: Arthritis
Ginger
Why it’s good: This spicy root contains compounds that work similarly to some anti-inflammatory medications. However, ginger can also act as a blood thinner, so if you’re taking a blood-thinning medication, ask your doctor if it’s safe to eat ginger.
Eat up! Ideally you want to get a hit of ginger every single day. Steep a few slices of the root in hot water to make tea, grate it into stir-fries or add ground ginger to smoothies.
Pumpkin
Why it’s good: Research has shown that certain antioxidants may help prevent arthritis, slow its progression and relieve pain by reducing inflammation associated with this condition. And pumpkin’s bright-orange hue is a clue that it’s rich in two of these antioxidants: beta-carotene and beta-cryptoxanthin. In fact, researchers from the UK found that people whose diets were high in beta-cryptoxanthin were half as likely to develop a form of inflammatory arthritis as those who ate very foods containing it.
Eat up! Try to eat one can of 100 percent pure pumpkin purée (not pumpkin pie filling!) every week. I make a “pudding” by stirring a dollop of pumpkin purée into vanilla yogurt along with a dash of cinnamon. You can also add a scoop of the puree to ground turkey meat sauce, taco filling or chili (the puree doesn’t altar the taste).
Red bell pepper
Why it’s good: Red bell peppers contain an impressive amount of inflammation-fighting carotenoids, but they also have more than 250 percent of the daily recommended amount of vitamin C. Research suggest that people who eat a diet low in vitamin C may be at greater risk for developing certain kinds of arthritis.
Eat up! Aim to have three red bell peppers a week. Mix pepper with cucumber, chickpeas and feta for a quick and easy lunch.
What’s ailing you: Type 2 diabetes
Beans
Why they’re good: Whether they’re kidney, pinto or navy, beans provide a winning combination of high-quality carbohydrates, protein and fiber that helps stabilize your body’s blood sugar levels and keeps hunger in check. (People with type 2 diabetes have trouble keeping their blood sugar levels stable because their bodies can’t produce or properly use insulin, which helps move glucose from your bloodstream into your cells.)
Eat up! Have beans as often as you can. Protein-rich beans and lentils are a smarter side dish than carb-filled pasta, rice or potatoes. Turn chickpeas (garbanzo beans) into a crunchy snack. Pat cooked beans dry, sprinkle with paprika, cumin or other spices, and roast in a 400°F oven for 20 to 25 minutes or until lightly browned and crunchy.
Egg whites
Why they’re good: Egg whites are the perfect base for a diabetes-friendly meal because they’re low-calorie (17 calories apiece) and rich in high-quality protein, so they can help keep your weight and blood sugar level on an even keel. And they’re cholesterol-free, since all the cholesterol is in the yolk.
Eat up! Aim to have at least three or four egg-based meals a week. An omelet with 4 egg whites (or 1 whole egg plus 2 or 3 egg whites), plenty of vegetables and some reduced-fat cheese for breakfast will set you up for a day of even-keeled blood sugar.
Nuts
Why they’re good: Nuts — all types, including peanuts, walnuts, pistachios, pecans and cashews — are primarily composed of heart-healthy fats and protein, two ingredients that keep blood sugar stable by slowing down the rate at which your body absorbs carbohydrates. Nuts also contain monounsaturated fat and, in some cases, omega-3s, both of which improve cholesterol and triglyceride levels. Since having type 2 diabetes also puts you at a higher risk for heart disease, nuts are a win-win.
Eat up! Snack on an ounce (one small handful) of your favorite nut daily — they all contain healthy fats.
What’s ailing you: Premenstrual syndrome (PMS)
Cheese
Why it’s good: Studies have found that women with PMS have lower levels of calcium around ovulation than women who don’t experience PMS symptoms, so amping up your intake of cheese and other dairy products is worth a shot if you’re prone to cramps and mood swings.
Eat up! Make sure you’re getting at least the recommended amount of calcium daily — experts say only 10 percent of us are getting it through diet alone! Women younger than 50 need 1,000 mg; if you’re 50 or older, 1,200 mg. Aim for three servings of calcium-rich foods like cheese and yogurt daily; women older than 50 should tack on a fourth serving. If you don’t think that’s possible, talk to your doctor about taking a calcium supplement.
Pineapple
Why it’s good: This fruit has three things going for it. First, it’s one of the best sources of manganese, and one study found that women with low manganese intakes were more likely to experience premenstrual mood swings, breast tenderness and cramping. Second, pineapple and other water-rich fruits and vegetables (think berries, citrus fruits, melon, cucumbers, bell peppers) can help banish bloat associated with your monthly cycle because their high water content helps flush out excess fluid. Lastly, deliciously sweet pineapple is a healthy way to indulge sugar cravings, which often intensify as your period approaches.
Eat up! In the seven to 10 days leading up to your period, have 1 cup of fresh pineapple daily. If it’s too expensive or underripe, see if your store carries frozen chunks or canned pineapple packed in 100 percent juice.
Almonds
Why they’re good: Almonds are an excellent source of magnesium, another mineral that may provide some PMS relief. Studies have found that magnesium — in addition to helping relieve PMS headaches — can improve mood and lessen water retention in the week or two before you get your period.
Eat up! Enjoy an ounce of almonds (about 22 nuts) a day, and enrich your diet with other magnesium-rich foods like quinoa, pumpkin and sunflower seeds, dark leafy greens, edamame and green beans.
What’s ailing you: Osteoporosis
Broccoli
Why it’s good: Broccoli gives you four bone-building nutrients in one convenient package: vitamins C and K, potassium and some calcium. Studies have found that getting enough of vitamins C and K is linked to having high bone density. Potassium (and other compounds found in produce) may reduce bone loss by acting as a buffer against metabolic acids, which some studies suggest contribute to the breakdown of bone tissue.
Eat up! Serve broccoli at least three times a week, and if you need extra incentive to dig in, sprinkle your florets with a bit of grated cheese (which adds more calcium!).
Skim milk
Why it’s good: Skim milk is an obvious choice for strong bones, since 1 cup contains 300 mg of calcium — about a third of the daily recommended amount.
Eat up! Work it into your daily diet by making oatmeal with a cup of skim milk instead of water, including 1 cup in a fruit smoothie, or having a mug of low-fat cocoa made with 1 cup of nonfat milk. Feel free to substitute soy or almond milk (as long as the carton says it’s fortified with calcium).
Yogurt
Why it’s good: If you don’t get enough calcium in your diet your body will start “borrowing” what it needs from the calcium stored in your bones. What’s great about yogurt is that it’s a good source of calcium and protein — and both are necessary for bone strength. Studies show that people who don’t get enough protein have lower bone density.
Eat up! Opt for Greek varieties over traditional yogurt to get twice as much protein (and go for non-fat).
What’s ailing you: Heart disease
Oatmeal
Why it’s good: It’s rich in soluble fiber, which latches on to cholesterol compounds and helps carry them out of your body. Research shows that people who eat an average of 2.5 servings of whole grains (like oats) daily have a 21 percent lower risk of cardiovascular events such as heart attack and stroke than people who hardly eat any.
Eat up! Enjoy oatmeal at least three times a week, and spruce it up with berries, nuts, dried apricots, even peanut butter.
Sweet potato
Why it’s good: Sweet potatoes deliver more heart-healthy fiber than their white cousins, along with a hefty dose of potassium, a mineral that helps offset sodium’s negative effect on blood pressure.
Eat up! Try to eat at least two of these spuds a week. I like to mash them with a drop of skim milk, a pat of whipped butter and a bit of cinnamon.
Wild salmon
Why it’s good: Wild salmon is one of the most concentrated sources of omega-3 fats, which can help lower triglycerides, raise levels of HDL (“good”) cholesterol, and help reduce inflammation in the body — a factor that’s been linked to an increased risk of diabetes as well as heart disease. What’s more, numerous studies have found that people whose diets are high in omega-3s have a substantially lower risk of coronary heart disease, as well as sudden death from arrhythmia (an irregular heartbeat).
Eat up! Aim to eat salmon at least twice a week. Although wild and farmed salmon contain similar levels of omega-3s, wild is lower in contaminants and has as much as four times the amount of vitamin D. But wild salmon is more expensive and not as widely available as farmed. If you can’t make room for it in your budget, you’re better off eating farmed salmon than going without it completely.
What’s ailing you: Migraine headaches
Quinoa
Why it’s good: Magnesium deficiency has been linked to migraines, and 1 cup of whole grain quinoa, a protein-rich seed, provides 30 percent of the daily recommended amount of magnesium. Getting enough of this mineral seems to be particularly helpful in preventing menstrual migraines.
Eat up! Have a helping at least three times a week in place of rice, pasta or other starches. Turn quinoa into a pilaf with chopped carrots, enjoy it as a hot cereal (like oatmeal), or use it as a base for a stir-fry or chili.
Ground flaxseed
Why it’s good: Studies have shown that omega-3s — found in high amounts in flaxseeds — can help reduce the frequency, duration and severity of headaches, probably by reducing inflammation.
Eat up! Add a tablespoon a day to yogurt, oatmeal, cereal or smoothies. You can also mix ground flaxseed into meatballs or combine with whole-wheat bread crumbs for a crispy coating for baked chicken tenders.
Spinach
Why it’s good: Spinach contains a good amount of magnesium as well as riboflavin, a B vitamin that may help reduce headache frequency and severity.
Eat up! Squeeze in at least three servings of spinach a week, and try to get more of other riboflavin-rich foods like lean beef, whole-grain cereals, mushrooms and asparagus. Also, speak to your doctor about whether riboflavin supplements might help.